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Posts by LennyD

Well said.I have been slowly bringing an older well abused Tojiro sujihiki back to life, and after grinding away on the most coarse whet stone i have to remove the countless chips and chunks in the edge I decided that I would move well below the 1000 and even use my old Norton oil stone for thinning.It's just a lot of steel to remove, and lots of work etc si I totally can understand why some would not look forward to doing a lot of thinning.But it has to be done for good...
Best advice I can think of for this early in the game etc is to keep asking questions, and research the new questions that develop from the answers, and repeat Also unless I missed it please share your budget, and unless it's large dedicate much of it to the gyuto or chef's since it will normally see the most use and therefore is most important to get right. Two first questions are if your sure you don't want too thin (the carbo next is very thin and that's part of the...
Had a similar problem with my past Germans and ultimately it wasn't what I was sharpening with (not wet stones but oil at the time) but the combination of angle and steel. Since I had decreased the total edge angle because I wasn't fully happy with stock angle performance going backwards wasn't an option, and I ended up going Japanese where the steel would handle the steeper angles, accept a much higher polish (and see improved performance from it) and as a additional...
One point to remember on sharpening free hand is that it is much more intimidating than it is difficult. Honestly it's really not that hard at all once you get down the basics, and I have to believe the learning process can't be all that much longer than figuring out a jig system. I would love for my knives to stay sharp forever, but even if that was possible I would miss the connection and feeling of accomplishment that comes from making your knives scary sharp with...
That looks interesting, and I do like the stone rollers idea, but the 400 grit sounds very coarse (I use 1000 as a start stone when sharpening and end as high as 6k depending on the knife).
Have to totally agree with each of you having your own chefs (main, most often used etc) knife. It may complicate things a bit initially, but will make life much easier later on, and if your choices are different allow for comparison. Though personally I prefer not to buy a knife (or other products) from a "brand" name seller who relies on their name recognition to sell their products at a price beyond their value (or to be blunt I don't enjoy being duped by buying a...
Makes sense lol.
Five days and not one response? I believe both of your choices to be beyond my budget, but was honestly looking forward to seeing the comparison. Consider this a free bump lol
OK so your looking for rock bottom cost. That's no problem, or surprise (most of my Brit friends have been known to be called cheapskates, and even the wealthy ones so I'll cut you some slack here lol) and there are options.I have used e syringe everything from garage sale oil stones, nikken or other sand paper over marble or hardwood blocks, and even the bottom rough area on cups for cheap knives in a pinch.They all work to varying degrees, and results do change with...
great pointGuess could slow it down, but every method I know of its more expensive than the actual sander lol
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