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Posts by pcieluck

Just the mathematics of it, Smork.  Why have twice as many people doing what half the people could do, if people were positioned differently in the kitchen?  That other half can be doing things that are actually useful.  There's no point helping a dog chase it's own tail.
I understand that knowledge and experience running a business are essential to being a successful chef.  I look at what the captains of the industry are doing, and consider what my own dreams are, and realize I'm nowhere close to either of them.  There's a lot more I want to do before I find myself buried in paperwork, or babysitting.  I never want to be one of those managers people respect little more than an overpaid expediter.     Even as a chef I'd want to stay...
Where I'm working right now, it seems the longer time goes by, and the better I get at my job, the less cooking I actually do.  To a degree, I understand this.  There are things that need to get done, and I do precisely that, get it done.  On the other hand, I spend a lot of time wondering why I'm helping people do this that I could do myself.  I don't want to sound arrogant or pretenteous, but I'm one of the few people (if not the only) in that business who can be...
instant yeast is obviously not as powerful as fresh yeast, not even close.  you've omitted molasses, therefor giving your yeast less food to cause rise, malts also feed yeasts longer than honey.  that rise time seems unnecessarily long.  when making bread in a small volume with instant yeast an initial rise, and one punch down is usually sufficient. your rise, as you stated, isn't right, so you clearly don't need to punch it down so many to keep it from falling...
Egg whites... The white part of a fried egg; or hard boiled eggs for example.  The way it tastes and smells both make me gag instantly.
Pete, I agree that mounted butter and cheese make the best sauce, but that's the "cheap version". I assume the guy having his father cater was on a bit of a budget
Turkey with.... roasted corn puree, roasted potatoes and carrots.   soups... a few of those vegatables make fine soups by simmering them until tender, pureeing, seasoning, and adding enough of the water they were cooked in to get the desired consistency.   Fruit salads, I've never in my life been able to get enough fruit salad.   Buckwheat pasta, requires only buckwheat flour, water, and a pinch of salt. Served with spinach, broccoli, and maybe some chicken,...
my recipe for one, multiply by 60   pasta for one: 1 egg, ~1/2c flour, 1 tsp olive oil, 1 tsp kosher salt   sauce (the cheaper version) 1 tbs butter, 1 tbs flour, 1c milk, 1 c Parmesan, 1 tbs sour cream, salt, pepper, nutmeg, parsley,    so you'll have your pasta done ahead of time, your sauce boiling hot; and from here you can either add your pasta straight into the piping hot sauce or give it a quick dunk into boiling water and into the sauce. I've seen...
I'm yet to eat a veggie "burger" that i've found pleasant.
this conversation could tie into your other post. but no puree i've ever made needed more than a half hour of cook time.  usually simmering whatever it is i want to puree, then puree, then adding seasonings, dairy products, and whatever. after this you want to heat it up but not really cook it anymore. even if you're using a bain-marie, at this point it can still burn pretty easily.
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