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Posts by mano

If you're through JCK seriously consider Carbonext. Expect to sharpen it your self out of the box, but it is the best all around basic knife I've used. The Toyota Camry or Honda Accord of knives. Nothing fancy, but does everything well. Nimble but robust enough to do most any kitchen task.
Here's how I do it:   Salt fowl legs and thighs with a tbs. of sea or kosher salt each, and put them on a plate. For each leg crush 2 cloves of garlic and a fresh sprig of thyme and put it on top. Some people also add bay leaves or other herbs/spices.   Cover with saran wrap and cure for a day or so.   Rinse and dry the legs and put in an oven pan. Cover with duck fat (when cooking the fat from the legs will add to the fat). Put them in a 200 degree oven for 8-12...
+1 on confit the next time you have turkey legs.
I have a large walnut end-grain board (not Boardsmith) and put feet on one side. Almost five years later it's in great shape. I oil the used side every 4-6 weeks and the other side every three months.
The miserable cuss part was supposed to be me joshing Ice Man. He's been accused of all sorts of curmudgeonly comments and usually rolls with it. 
Ice Man, I know you're a judgmental miserable cuss who takes pride in being oppositional, but you appear to be an accomplished chef who knows the most important part of a knife is a sharp edge.     It just so happens that some knives, mostly made in Japan or patterned after J knives, take and hold a really sharp edge. They tend to be made of steels that can be heat treated to those standards. Throw in certain profiles for better board contact and tip work, geometries...
Benuser, I'm nowhere near an expert at sharpening, but would stropping -on newspaper or something similar- and pulling through a cork do the trick?
Keep things simple and practical. A 500 grit stone(Beston is very popular for good reason) will get rid of the nicks and can be used when you eventually thin behind the edge. A 1000 or 1200 (Bester, same reason as Beston) will get you a really sharp edge that any pro would be happy with. It's fine for touch-up, as well.   No real need for anything higher than 1K even though I have a use a high grit stone.   Forget steeling a J knife.
As a mental health professional and occasional intern prep cook intern, my concern is these actions today might land a cook on the floor with a knife in his/her gut. Or at least false allegations of who knows what that will make your life miserable, even if no one believes them.
We ended up with a oaky Napa chard (my wife likes them), a flinty French chablis (a white I like) and a few southern Rhone's. All went well and the pasta turned out better than expected.
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