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Posts by mano

We ended up with a oaky Napa chard (my wife likes them), a flinty French chablis (a white I like) and a few southern Rhone's. All went well and the pasta turned out better than expected.
Fresh pasta rolled thinner than store-bought. Lasagna is such a heavy dish, this lightens it up considerably.   To really impress guests make 1/3 of the sheets red (red pepper), 1/3 green (spinach) and 1/3 without coloring. Arrange colors to match the Italian flag. Be a bit stingy with the top layer of sauce and cheese so they see the flag.   Sounds like something from one of those white-bread cooking magazines, but people like it.
Red is fine
I'm making the squid ink pasta fresh along with grilled squid, shrimp and scallops.   Wife doesn't like sauvignon blanc, otherwise anything goes. 
If the hall generates a lot of business then it's a matter of whether or not it's worth it to you. Food manufacturers pay supermarkets a kickback of sorts for preferred eye-level shelf placement. The increased volume more than covers that expense.   Most halls with preferred vendors have several good ones to chose from. Like it or not, it's pay to play capitalism.
With all due respect, you really need to do your homework. You keep arguing about why your design should work, even with modifications. If you want to design and sell an expensive aesthetically pleasing but virtually worthless cleaver, fine. But don't ask the opinions of people who know how to cook.
There's a reason why cleavers have essentially the same design for the past 150+ years. The cleaver you're proposing for the home and novice cook is doing them a disservice. Even for light duty your cleaver is poorly designed. It's thick behind the edge and after less than an inch of m metal blade the bamboo will cause impossible wedging. You say it's for people with a "strong desire for designer products which serve a purpose" but there's no real practical purpose to it....
Regardless of what a seller says, kitchen knives directly from the maker are rarely full-potential sharp. The expectation is for the end user to sharpen it to their liking. That includes angles, microbevels and so forth. Once that's done with your knife then you'll decide whether or not you're dissapointed. 
This appears to be an ethical issue and the OP's thread title (Blatant stealing/copying) and their post (I do give them credit for the inspiration) both clarifies and muddies the water. The fact is most restaurant food, as chefross points out, is copying. Or at least derived of something that's already out there. But, in some cases when a chef's work is a new or unique idea that happens to be really good, is it reasonable to expect others not to copy it? Either exactly as...
If not already posted, the SVS Demi is on sale for $199. Ends today.   http://slickdeals.net/permadeal/113530/sousvide-supreme---sous-vide-supreme-demi-immersion-circulator?page=5#comments    coupon code DEMIFOR199 = $199 + free shipping
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