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Posts by BrianShaw

http://www.pastrychef.com/INVERTASE_p_1560.html
They are great... and last a very long time too.  Do not hesitate.  The only part of parchment paper that is more convenient is that parchment is disposed and silicone mats must be washed.  That is not a deal breaker to me.
May I please have permission to find this humorous and laugh... without having to be chastized or be expected to pay for your next therapy session? 
Good description!  Well, most everything seems reasonable to me.  Keeping cold is important.  You must have a hot kitchen, even for CA!   The only thing I can say is that you have to be careful about "sealing the sides".  Too much sealing and hte puf won't rise correctly.  Also, I tend to bake puff at hotter temp - 400 deg usually.
Well, the proportions are close to what I know.  there may not be any real value in simulating pastry flour since AP will work fine.  And commerical folks may use shortning instead of butter.  And a lot of folks use cream instead of water, but can't imagine that there is much of a difference.   And then what... how did you build your puff pastry?  And what were ou making?  And how did you bake?  And how did you store your baked goods overnight?   The more details you...
I understand your trepidation, Mimi, but I would stop worrying if I were you.  :)   Perhaps this wiki would be usefull also:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puff_pastry   I'm still waiting for the OP to address the question posed earlier - recipe and technique used.  So far there isn't much given and I'm not even sure the OP really means puff pastry versus another pastry type.   If, indeed, it is puff... then I would venture a guess that it is technique (both making...
You can also freeze the dough for the second loaf if you want to wait even longer before you bake it.
Down the drain is a fine way to dispose of your excess yeast mixture.   One option for you to consider is first rise then divide your dough and pan one, but refrigerate the second until your pan is once again available.  You'll need to bring adjust the second rise time in the pan for the second loaf (allow more time) since the dough will be cold and needs to come up to temp before it will rise in earnest.   Another option is to half your recipe so you only yield one...
Why are you inciting a riot when the OP probably decided on an option that fit his/her needs several years ago? 
Possibly underbaking, and the residual moisture is taking your flake awya.  But hte real solution is to not let the patry last until the next day. 
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