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Posts by Pete

 There are some really good suggestions there.  I would definitely look towards game meats, if you customers would buy it as well as octopus.  We used to get antelope from a ranch in Texas, can't quite remember the name right now (Broken Arrow maybe?). Yes, the same old, same old can get boring for a chef, but you have to remember to put yourself into the customer's shoes.  For many of them, they are looking for those familiar proteins.  That doesn't mean that you only...
Here, at home, you won't find less than 4 mustards in my fridge, and often more than that.  There's yellow mustard-sorry but burgers and dogs always get the American yellow stuff!!  Then there is a smooth Dijon, usually Grey Poupon-usually used for making emulsified dressings and usually mayo.  Then there is always 1 or 2 whole grain mustards, usually for sandwich making and for sausages and I always keep a horseradish mustard on hand although I always have prepared...
Again, I would advise to have someone else do it so that you can enjoy, but this new information does make a difference and I'd say that if you are set on doing it then go ahead and do it yourself.  Doing the reception a few days after the wedding does make a huge difference and it will allow you to enjoy your wedding day.  I would still consider a compromise where you do some of it  and have someone else handle the rest.  Maybe do all the preparation but then hire a few...
It sounds like you have the right attitude about trying to cater your own wedding; low key, simple, and, at least, hiring a chef the day of, but even then I would strongly recommend not doing it yourself.  There is just too much going on and too much that you should be a part of, rather than stuck in the kitchen getting things ready.   If you really want to have a hand in it then hire out most of it and do a few small things.  I originally wanted to cater my own wedding...
I have never had "Duke's" but Someday says it has a "sourness" to it.  So would you describe it more like traditional mayo or more a Miracle Whip or something else altogether different.
The short answer is most of the time whole lettuce is a better deal than the pre cut stuff but not always.  The pre-cut stuff is less prone to short, high spikes in pricing, but IMHO you sacrifice quality.  That pre cut stuff always tastes "off" to me as it has been treated so that it doesn't turn brown quickly.
 I can't recommend a brand name as they are in Korean.  I can only read the fine print (in English) that says Korean chili powder.  I'd look online to see if you can order any.  I highly doubt that you would find it at Whole Foods.  But it is definitely worth that little added effort.  It makes all the difference between okay kimchi and good kimchi.
What temperature are you frying at?  Most times frying calls for temperatures of 350-375°F but in this case I would drop my frying temperature down to 325 or a little lower.   Secondly, I wouldn't precook the chicken.  Just stuff, bread and freeze.   Finally, when it comes to burgers, I wouldn't bother making ahead and freezing.  Making burger patties isn't that time consuming and it seems to me that it takes more forethought and planning to make burger patties, freeze...
I suck at hunting morels!!!!!
I agree with Terry, you should buy some and try it first, not necessarily to see if you will like it (if you like cabbage, fermented foods and spicy you'll like Kimchi) but to get an idea for what it tastes like so that when you make it you know if you've been successful or not.   There are hundreds, if not thousands of recipes, and video how-to's, on how to make kimchi.  They can vary somewhat in their ingredients and there are a couple of different ways to start the...
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