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Posts by Pete

I agree with the statement of eat it as you would like it.  For me, I would prefer it without the cheese, but if you are going to add cheese I like phatch's suggestion of Asiago.  Just don't do what they do here in Wisconsin and throw either cheddar or mozz on just about everything!!! (not that I've ever seen them throw it on scampi but they do throw it on numerous fish dishes that I would never expect cheese on)
Fermentation crocks and airlocks and such are great, but you can do ferments without them.  You just need a way to keep your product submerged underneath the brine, preferably by a couple of inches but even by an inch is fine.  You can do this by bags filled with water or weighted plates that fit just within your jars or crocks.  As long as the food is submerged you don't really even need a lid, let alone one that is sealed, which you really don't want or you could end up...
Plus, gas responds faster in my opinion.  When you change temperatures, with electric, the heating element takes time to heat up or cool down.
I always prefer gas over electric in a professional setting.  Less to go wrong with it.  With electric, heating elements burn out, connections short out and, fry and fray over time.  With gas, you still have the control box that can have issues but the burners and pilot usually don't cause lots of issues.  Just an occasional change out of the thermostat.
I lot would depend on what kind of place you are planning on opening.  What kind of hours are you going to be open to generate that $25,000 a month?  How many additional staff are you going to need besides yourself?   In general, I agree that $5500 a month for rent seems pretty high for a place that is only planning on generating $$25,000.00 a month in revenue, but if the rest of your expenses are being kept really low (I'm thinking casual, counter service crab shack)...
 That's a very American, 1st World centric viewpoint.  The worst part of that statement is "from doritos, to mcd,".  Much of world doesn't even have access to those foods let alone eat those foods regularly.  I would disagree that most of the world survives on really bad food.  Bad, by whose standard?  There are simple peasant foods and street foods that will blow you away with their flavor.  There are Indian and Thai Curries and Mexican Moles that would boggle your mind...
In a stand alone restaurant, where the menu changed every night I think you could get away with 5 entrees, along with the shared plates, but again, for an Inn where you have the potential of guests staying for 3-5 nights, or longer, I think you need a minimum of 8-12 entrees, but I think you could keep it pared down to that.
In general, I don't have a problem with small menus and 5-6 entrée options I am usually fine with, but you are an Inn so my question is what is the average length of stay of your guests?  If you are only offering 5 entrees and 2 of those contain pork and I have a religious objection to pork, or 2 of them are seafood and I am allergic to seafood now I only have 3 options to choose from.  I am a guest staying at your Inn for 4 nights.  That menu could get old with only 3...
The big question really is about acid levels.  If your sauce isn't acidic enough you will want to pressure can it, for safety reasons.  Sorry but I don't have those numbers now as I am at work, but lots of sauces technically aren't acidic enough, according to modern standards to be safe when canned using the old fashioned water bath method and should be pressure canned to achieve high enough temperatures.  That being said, I can salsa every year using a standard water bath...
 While I will drink a Frappuccino on a very rare occasion, I don't see what all the hype is about them and overall, I'm not a big fan of iced coffee, but when I'm in the mood you really can't beat a Vietnamese Iced Coffee!! Lemon or Lime?
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