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Posts by Pete

Ramp season will be winding up here, in Wisconsin, soon.  I only got out once, although I might try again this weekend.  Luckily, my favorite hunting grounds were over run with ramps so although I only got out once, last weekend, I got quite a haul and am still eating on the ones I grilled last weekend.   While I love ramps in all their forms, my favorite way is grilled.  I can then use them in a variety of recipes.  Grilling couldn't be easier.  I build a fire on 1 side...
3 hours does seem like an excessive amount of time unless you are doing a very large roast or cooking it very slowly.   The short answer to your question is no you can't, at least the way you describe it.  Sure you could do it in stages, but there are safety concerns as well as quality concerns, but you cannot do as you are asking for the simple reason of heat transfer.  If the recipe calls for cooking the roast for 3 hours, it is assuming that the entire time it is...
I think that this is a great challenge-the operative word being challenge.  For some of us chef's we are little more used to thinking in terms of costs, but for the average home cook, and even less so, for the dedicated "foodie" or "gourmand" looking at a meal in terms of a tight budget is not a way of thinking that many do.  It is much easier to put out spectacular dishes when budget is not a concern.  It is much more difficult when there are strict constraints on...
Here in Wisconsin, at the major grocery stores.  I rarely see any beef priced for anything less than $4.00 a pound, even with sales prices.  This includes the cheapest "ground beef"  which is usually at $4.19-4.29 when bought in sizes larger than 3 pounds.  Anything with the word "steak" in the title is usually $6.99 and up, even if it's those really think "steaks" cut from tougher cuts of meat.  Wisconsin is full of little local "meat markets" and luckily there you can...
Doesn't seem very efficient if you can only cook 1 piece at a time.
I don't have an air fryer so I can't say for certain, but this thread got me interested in them so I did a bit of research.  From what I have read/seen you can't really do "battered" foods without cooking them first.  The forced air circulation of an air fryer will take off most of the batter, so unless you are doing a very thin "batter" and then coating it in crumbs/crust of some kind it doesn't sound like trying to cook battered food in an air fryer would yield good...
Hank, I use cinnamon in lots of my BBQ sauces, and I have a lot of them.  Sometimes it is straight cinnamon and other times its a component of the curry powder I use.  When I use cinnamon, in BBQ sauce I use a very light hand.  It's not really something that you want to taste, but it helps support and accent many of the other components.   As for sweeteners, I usually use brown sugar for most of my BBQ sauces.  You can use only, but as others have said, go with...
The internet is full of tips and suggestions regarding the freezing of cheese.  I find that only semi-hard and hard cheeses freeze without being completely destroyed, but my general rule of thumb is that I don't freeze any cheese that I plan on eating as is.  In other words, I will only freeze cheeses that I plan on cooking with, not eating straight up.  I have found that really is no need to freeze cheese, usually.  Unless you are buying in a cheese shop, the chances are...
I seem to remember hearing about the pancake thing a number of years ago, but I don't remember the details, but I thought they were just using the dry mix and not actually making a batter out of it.  But like I said, this was quite a while ago and I don't really remember the details.  I agree with KK, I'm not sure how crispy the batter would get.  I'm wondering about dipping the chicken in flour, then pancake batter and then into some kind of breading for the crunch factor.
Personally, the way I usually eat them is just boiled until tender and start pulling them apart and dipping them in aioli while still warm.  Once you get to the heart, scoop out the choke and dip that in aioli also.  It has to be a really garlicy aioli though.
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