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Posts by Pete

Don't get me wrong, I believe that American Chili Powder (the blend) and Curry Powder both have their uses and I use them quite often (of course not interchangeably!!! ).  But, especially with Chili Powder, here in the US, it's important to understand that when using it you are adding a whole bunch of other spices to whatever dish you are adding it to, also.  I still rarely make a pot of chili that doesn't contain, at least some amount of chili powder, even when I am using...
 Yes, it does seem counter intuitive that "chili powder" in the US would be a spice blend and not just dried powdered chili peppers, but what is sold in the US as "chili powder" is a blend like I described.  The really sad thing is, most people here probably don't even realize that it is a blend of spices not just ground up chili peppers.  They just throw it into anything "Mexican" without thinking, although I think that mindset is changing. As for what it is used for, it...
 Because in this day and age there is no excuse not to know that these bastardized foods are really American inventions (although made by those of ethnic descent, sometimes because they lacked ingredients found in their native lands and sometimes as a concession to American tastes) and the consequences of not knowing can not only make you look stupid but can help perpetuate the stereotype that Americans are culturally stupid, insensitive people.  Here's a great a example: ...
There is absolutely nothing wrong with loving these items, when prepared well. The only issue I have with them is people thinking that they are "authentic" ethnic foods when they are really Americanized zersions of ethnic dishes or concepts. Personally, I love General Tsos Chicken and Gyros. Fajitas Im not so fond of but thats just a personal thing with bell peppers. I dont care if they are authentic or not.
There's a great documentary on Netflix called "Searching for General Tso" about the American/Chinese dish called General Tso's Chicken as there really isn't an exact counterpart to it in China.  A fun documentary to watch.
 In the US, "chili powder" is almost always a spice blend, usually with ground chili peppers, black pepper, cumin, oregano, and sometimes a bit of garlic. Go to most any grocery store in the US, buy "Chili Powder" and this is what you would end up with.  If you want unadulterated ground chili then you would buy ground cayenne pepper (found in every grocery store).  If you wanted to find other chili peppers, in ground form you would need to look in ethnic stores, specialty...
Like what the others said, keep your head down, stay neutral and ride it out for a while.  But I wouldn't give it too long.  I'd see how it goes and if it doesn't get better in 6 months or so I'd consider looking for a new job.  I've seen these things turn around and I've seen these things get really toxic and stay that way for years.
In Cleveland you have to stop at the West Side Market.  It is an indoor food market with lots of great local vendors (bakers, butchers, etc.  The building is beautiful and the sights and smells are wonderful.  Plenty of opportunities for some great pictures.  Also, for outdoor photography, check out the Cleveland Metroparks.  In the western suburbs of Cleveland there is a large valley that is still left relatively undeveloped.  it has been turned into a string of parks and...
Honestly, the only thing that seems off to me on that is the cheese.  I've seen all sorts of toppings on them, but to be honest, I don't think I've ever seen anyone in Indiana put cheese on it.  But it's your sandwich so you are welcome to dress it however you want.  It seems to be a pretty personal thing as most places I know, if you don't order anything on it, it will only come with a couple slices of pickle.
Shamom, you can order Hungarian bacon online from a company called Bende & Sons.  It's a really good product.
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