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Posts by Pete

You don't need advice from chefs, you need advice from a lawyer or someone versed in labor law.  I too live in Wisconsin, and sorry to say, but you have an uphill battle.  The system is pretty rigged to side with the employee.  Whether fortunately, or unfortunately, the days of paying people "under the table" or coming up with payment deals based on a handshake. You can't do it in this industry any longer because somehow, some way it is going to come back and bite you in...
Just me and my brother, and our families (my wife and our 2 daughter, his wife and their 2 daughters).
I assume that we are talking New England Lobster Rolls (chunks of lobster in some sort of dressing and stuffed into a bun or roll).  If so, then I go traditional and say mayo based dressing all the way, with a little celery, for crunch and just a bit of onion, and maybe a few other seasonings, but not much, and then served in a New England style hot dog bun with the outsides toasted.  There are probably better ways to dress it, to make the lobster stand out more, but then,...
Around here corned beef is usually on sale the whole week leading up to St. Pat's day and then if they overbought, super discounted the day after.  Either way we usually buy a couple (can't even make my own for that sale price) and put some in the freezer for later, for Ruebens and Corned Beef Hash.
Fondue bourguignonne was the term I was looking for, but couldn't remember last night.  My brain was mush yesterday-and, no, not from drinking the day before!   As for the "classic" sauces that usually accompany it I will probably be staying way from any of the Hollandaise based ones or reduction sauces.   That looks tasty.  Thanks!
For lack of a better term, and I know there is one, but can't think of it right now-the main course fondue where you cook the meats and veg in hot oil.
Next week is my Dad's 76th birthday and we are all getting together.  One night we are going to do fondue, which we haven't done, together, as a family in years.  We are going to do 3 courses; Cheese, Oil, and Chocolate.  My brother is handling the Cheese fondue, I'm handling the Chocolate Fondue and together we are doing the main course fondue.  I am trying to come up with a bunch of dipping sauces and while I am not at a loss for ideas, I'd still love to hear what ideas...
 That's actually, probably my least favorite way of eating them.  I like them in salads, on "antipasto" platters and right out of the can or jar.  Mostly I prefer them cold or room temperature.  There are a few warm applications that I like them in, but mostly in uncooked applications.  They can also be a great flavor enhancer like fish sauce in Thai and Vietnamese cuisine.  Just a little, minced into a fine paste and stirred into whatever you are cooking.  It dissolves...
 I usually also just go by fork feel, but the temperatures I gave are what I would expect it to be reaching based on how I cook brisket for barbecue, which again I usually do by fork feel, unless I'm getting really serious then it is a combination of fork feel and temperature so as to not go too far. As far as the veggies are concerned, I add them to the beef, but I do it in stages.  About 1 hour before its done I add the onions and carrots, wait 20 minutes, add the...
Am I the only one that thinks that 140, like Jimyra mentions in the OP, is way underdone for corned beef?  At that temp its going to be really, really tough.  Corned beef takes hours in a braise, or on the smoker (basically making pastrami)-anywhere from 2-4 hours, depending on size (or longer if smoking, possibly).  In that time you are going to reach internal temperatures of 185-195, at which point all that tough connective tissue in the brisket will have broken down,...
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