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Posts by Pete

That's a really open ended question.  There are tons of great sauces for shrimp.  A lot will depend of how you are cooking it, what the accompaniments are, what flavors you like, what types of cuisines you like.   Here are just a few of my favorites:   Vanilla-Rum Butter Sauce Creole Sauce Jerk Sauce Tomato Butter Sauce any number of spicy latin inspired tomato based sauces various styles of "curry" from Southeast Asia   I can go on and on as there is no "one...
Granted, I never worked in an "Italian" restaurant so we wouldn't sell tons of ravioli, but  we often served a ravioli appetitzer or it would accompany an entree.  After we made the ravioli we would freeze them in a single layer.  Once frozen we would pack them into bags for service.  At service time we'd just dump the frozen ravioli into our water.  Only took a minute or 2 longer to cook them directly from frozen than from thawed.  It was easy and you didn't have to worry...
flipflopgirl, right now, in my liquor cabinet you will find Maker's Mark, Buffalo Trace, Basil Hayden, Bulleit, and Jim Beam Rye (not my favorite Rye but a bottle someone brought over so I won't let it go to waste).  I also have a large cheap bottle of Kessler's whiskey-most definitely not for drinking, but I like to use bourbon a lot in my cooking, especially for stews and chilis and I doin't  waste the expensive stuff on something I going to cook for a long time.   For...
  Then you have never tried my Chocolate Bourbon Pecan Pie!!!!!
 I would have to humbly disagree.  When my parents owned their restaurant, in Vermont, they served a pecan pie that was made with maple syrup instead of corn syrup and while the taste was different (and better IMHO) the texture, look, and consistency was virtually identical to a "regular" pecan pie.  So I guess for me, for it to be a "real" pecan pie it has to have that "curd like" texture that you find in the traditional pie, but I guess, to me it doesn't matter what...
For as many restaurants as there are, the cooking world is a pretty small, tight community.  You didn't do yourself any favors by walking out without notice.  Word gets around and can make it hard to find your next job as chefs tend to talk to each other.  But what's done is done.  Next time though, you need to not let your emotions make your decision for you, and give your boss proper notice.
 While I whole-heartedly agree with this statement in general, I have to admit that I sometimes crave a thin "smashed" burger.  The key though is knowing how to do it properly so as to not press out all the juices. First, I start with a 75/25 mix (this is my preferred ratio for burgers no matter what style).  Form into a loosely packed 3-4 oz ball.  Place in a screaming hot cast iron skillet and smash the burger to about 1/4" thickness.  You must do this in the first...
Welcome Pete!!!!  You'll find a great community here focused on the world of food and cooking.  We have a massive database of forum topics so you can probably find information just about anything food related, and if you can't then just start a new thread.  Feel free to jump right in with comments on already started threads or ask your own questions by starting a new thread.  Welcome aboard.
Welcome Ninacooking!!!  We're glad to have you hear.  You'll find that this is a great resource for cooking not just in the US, but all around the world.  While we definitely skew towards cooking in the US we have a number of regular posters from other places in the world and we always welcome more as we can always use other perspectives on the world of food.
 While molasses would definitely work, I think it might just be a little to overwhelming a flavor for a pecan pie unless cut with another syrup or possibly sugar
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