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Posts by Wagstaff

Get the chef's you "always wanted" would be my advice before "the set...". Victorinox parers, petty, specialty. Then you'll figure out which profiles you'll use. Probably fewer than at first imagined. But you know you'll use the chef's (cook's, gyuto). And that's the weak spot for victorinox anyway.
Wa handles are light handles. A good thing for many of us. They're often less well finished, maybe less robust. Western knives use "balance" as a selling point. Wa handled knives are more likely to be blade heavy. Which is objectively, platonically, certainly better. Because I speak for god on this one issue. You don't want a santoku. If you do, it's just to prove to yourself you don't. Unless you have very limited space and want to save money. Yiu don't want to spent...
MACs were a gateway-drug to several J-knife freaks I know.   I don't actually know what you mean by "open", truth be told.  In the "trad" sense of opening a knife, the Macs are pre-opened. They come with a good OOTB edge usually.  No question a good sharpener can make it better by another 25% or so.  (Damn, I don't mean to sound that precise about something that's not so precise.  I just mean it's definitely more than "halfway there" but there is some room for...
I don't know the Shaptons either.  But in general... the XC is ok, slower than the XXC; and the XC will STICK.  Not an issue if you keep the water flowing and keep the XC moving, really, but... no advantage.   I like the little DMT (or Diaface) "ski sharpeners" afterwards.  In various grits, they are basically TINY flattening stones.  Not so much for flattening, but for refining mud or hitting on particular spots on a stone that's been flattened with the bigger stone.
I'm not sure. For chef's knives/gyutos, I suppose (only) 4.  One of them doesn't leave the cupboard much  -- it's my "breaker" and since I've been eating veggie, don't have much call for it.  I'm even ok with using my CarboNext for butternut squash and kabocha.  No problem, actually.   (I have the same knives as you -- though a longer CN -- and also a Yoshihiro/Gesshin Uraku 270mm.  I lust after several others -- also like you -- but have run out of cash for just...
A 300 what? Gyuto? (That's a big one if so). By sujuki I think you mean sujihiki. Which is a japanese made western slicer. Is that what you already have in 300mm? Sorry I'm not helpful with answering your question. I hope I can help clarify it at least.
This.
1. - probably not.  If you live in an incredibly high-humidity environment (a rainforest?) maybe --but if you're using the knife every day or nearly so, generally no.  Oil it for longer term storage. 2. Hate that.  And I don't have a solution for you -- you have to run the knife with a more perpendicular-to-the stone angle of approach to avoid hitting the bolster. Which is a drag.  I don't know what else you can do (other than knocking off the bolster -- or finding...
...I had a lesson with Jon to start, and that... (mostly) on the JCK-bought combo stone.  Jon's comment at the time was that it was surprisingly ok.  And technique matters more than stone choice.  Still, I tried the Gesshin stones and that was that.   I have the 400 and 2000 (soaker) and 5000 (splash and go -- and an unusual stone for its nominal grit).  I like the soakers just fine - prefer them, really -- but understand that the 1000 is an amazing splash and go stone,...
I learned to sharpen on that combo stone. It was ok for my purposes. Separate stones are better in the long run if you're doing your own sharpening. And some stones are better to learn on than others. The thread with BDL's recommendations is great because he gives a bang for buck example, his own set example, and a no worries about price example. He knows more about sharpening than I. But my own biases are.... if you can get the pricey 3 stone all Gesshin set up, do it....
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