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Posts by Wagstaff

Unlike the Hall's Arkansas, that is a waterstone -- (maybe you know this already). If you do know that already, then there are differing opinions on combination stones 'round here.  I'll leave it alone till we get the first part out of the way, though....
Is it also possible the Masamoto KS is flatter than the Sabs?  I have a terrible  eye for profiles in pictures, so I'm not at all sure.  It appears to me the KS is flatter than the HC (yo-handled). And the HC is the same as the Sabs.   I have not seen the newer/flatter Konosukes in person. 
I don't have a suji.  Or I do if you count my 210mm petty (it is a short suji, really).  That said:   the sorts of problems you describe -- sure, epoxy and blade alignment issues are a drag, or the blade not firmly fixed into the handle is a drag.  Handy folks can fix those.  And more importantly, you can see those right away and return the knife for one that doesn't have that problem.    The overgrind issue is a different category.  You will see those if you're...
I could theorize that the blades look to be a different color because of a) the lighting, or b) they're not both showing the HD steel. The latter happens a lot on the internet.  One picture for the profile, or the handle, or whatever. In spite of the steels being different -- same picture.     D-shaped handles are meant to be for (usually) right handed user.   So the curve of the "D" nesltes into the palm of your hand.  Supposedly more comfortale than something...
It's a beloved steel all right... your technique has to be consistently good (or at least not ever bad) so as not to torque/twist the knife in the cut on hard veggies when you're in a hurry on the line.  It's a very thin knife.  I've held them... not used.   I hope BDL weighs in.  Or Jon on the various steels.   You gotta invest in sharpening stones, too, if you're not set up already.  (Just a bit of budgeting advice -- I don't know if you have this taken care of).
I'm nothin' like an expert on the different steels (Hitachi or otherwise).    Theoretically, the whites will be easier to sharpen and maybe even get sharper than the blues (ok, so I'm starting to answer your Takeda question -- might as well finish: the Super Blue ("AS") in the Takeda will theoretically have the best  edge retention of any we're talking about, get very hard, and be more difficult to sharpen; maybe not get *as* sharp as the whites -- but at this level,...
I feel like I could pretty much answer "for" BDL your particular questions... but I won't.  I won't deprive you or me of the pleasure of his more detailed response.   But just to assuage any hesitation... carbon steel knives require the same attention as others, pretty much, just sooner.  No laziness.  Rinse and towel dry after cutting.  Don't leave it on the board wet when you have dinner.  If you're cutting acidic things, rinse and towel try something like...
"Sharpie" is a brand name.  Permanent marker. Or sometimes they're called "laundry markers".  Or they were when I was a kid.  Back when computers were run on vacuum tubes.
Steel alloy is definitely a big issue.  It just has confounding variables (heat treatement, geometry).  And the hardness ratings are not irrelevant, they're just a proxy.  That is, we wish we had a different kind of hardness rated.  So you get a general idea, but then ask around about the particular knife or knifemaker (sic).    I hope someone else who knows interrupts to tell us about carbide sizes and "fine grainedness" and such.    Primary characterstic -- No. OR: I...
Me = Corrected! Still, best sharpening instruction videos on the web.
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