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Posts by JohnR

Are you perhaps comparing Norton's Oilstones with Nortons's or others Waterstones? That is where the grits are different.. between Oil and Waterstones regardless of the stone maker.
On the size question... there are differing opinions and it boils down to your personal preferences.   I have and use both sizes... At work it's no question, 240mm/10 inches was the go to knife while at home the first knife I grab is the 210/8 inch one. There's very little I can do with an 240mm/10 inch that I can't do with a 210/8 inch size.   What's the average prep in a home kitchen? A couple of onions, a few stalks of celery, a little meat maybe. My point is...
Sorry, I don't actually know the brand of the grill we have.   Our soups are usually for about 60+-  so about 15 qts. which I can do in either a steam kettle or large stock pot.   We have one of those low two stock pot burners that I prefer to use for that quantity. I can fine tune a simmer pretty good with it.   I don't like the tilt skillet much for soups/sauces because it is too large and the liquid evaporates very quickly with that amount in the tilt...
I never tried it for pancakes. French toast, grilled sandwiches are OK. Scrambled eggs with enough fat are OK, and veggies are fine.. although I prefer to oven roast veggies.   We occasionally use a brush on the drain faucet. The skillet in your pic, I did not see a pour lip at the front which would give you either option to drain (drain faucet is the other).   Overall, I think as a grill, tilt skillets can get the job done but they are not ideal .. a flat top is...
We have Clevelands models in both the auto and wheel tilts. All I can add is that they have not had any issues despite pretty heavy useage. Occasionally it will not start up which might be a result of an electrical issue but then we just hit the reset button and it then works fine.   For breakfast items (or using as a grill/griddle) one needs to bend over as opposed to a flat top grill, but the easy clean up of the tilt skillet makes up for the hassle.   The...
Green Guy, if you use a Suji, you should use a less finesse knife for the fish prep work.   I have broken down many whole fish including 10-25 lb salmon (steaking and fileting). Just my opinion but you already have a nice knife for that ... the Forschner Breaking knife ... thin slices will be much nicer with a Suji/slicer type of knife.   I may be also on the look out for a Suji, for home use (incl. catering and bbq comps) though and much less expensive than your...
"Cleaning, trimming, and trussing a dozen thighs, from start to finish, should take well under 30 minutes. What are you doing that uses so much time?"   BDL, I guess I'm not that good then ... 24 thighs takes me about 2 hours..   I do remove the skin and thin/remove fat from under the skin  .. it does take a while it get every thigh evenly sized, skin defatted, all other fat removed, etc.   Steve there is a decent tutorial at this link ... Also on the...
Steve, KCBS comps? What is the purpose for the shears? What do you use to trim chicken thighs?   I don't think the average cooks understands how much trimming goes into comp chicken thighs including thinning the fat from under the skin. I think I averaged about 5 minutes per thigh.   Chicken thigh prepping: I use a 145mm Petty-thin and scapel like sharp to trim meat and a Santoku to scrape the fat off the underside of the skin.   Rib prepping: trimming full...
After a main prep knife I think it gets down to personal preferences in your cooking style. There's a lot you can do with your Gyuto. Our salad/veg prep person uses nothing but a 10 inch Chef's and a peeler.   But some tasks are more ideal with another knife, like breaking down meat, carving large hams, briskets or roasts, crusty breads, sashimi, fileting fish, etc.   Persoanlly I use Chef's knives for just about everything, we also have a cheap folding pocket...
For my use it is a modification if I use a grip I've grown accostomed to for a couple of hours a day and then I need to adjust it for that particular knife handle.   I guess with home use of a few minutes a day it really doesn't matter much what grip is used and in fact that 8 inch Victorinox is fine for most people (just for me, the handle is not ideal). If I had to use one, I could always file/grind that area of the handle down so I could use the grip I use at work.
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