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Posts by JohnR

I have the 8 in Forschner Breaking knife and in the past when I fished a lot I've used it on plenty of Salmon, Ling Cod, and Halibut. Now I usually buy fished already pieced but when I need to prep the occasional whole fish I use the Breaking Knife.
"You should try looking on the internet for white handled chefs knives there not that uncommon we had one at my work, granted it was one of those plastic hanled knives that gets replaced every 2-4 weeks."   Ours don't get replaced, after numerious sharpenings (grindings) they get repositioned as boning/trimming knives :>   Seriously we get a lot of work done on these type of knives. They may not be the best but they work.. A 10 inch Dexter can do a variety of...
I only have one J knife ... a petty (gifted ot me) which is a size I almost never use... so usually I will use the same stones or my belt sander has higher micron grit and leather belts. But I really can't remember the last time I sharpened or even used this knife.   About the only think I think it's good for is when I want to trim/prep chicken thighs for BBQ competitions which is 2-3 times a year.   The lower grit stones are when you need/want to thin the edge...
OnePiecekeep in mind that the grits you used on the Forshner with Oil Stones are likely different than the Japanese grits. http://www.fine-tools.com/G10019.htm   With my softer steel knives (like Forshner) I use an ANSI grit size stone of about 800-1000, finish with a soft steeling and/or stropping and if needed about 300 ANSI for thinning. For standard food prepping I find I don't need much else.   I purchased my stones many years ago from Razor Edge...
I use a belt clip that I got from an old flashlight, but more often than not I use my qpron pocket.
If I'm not mistaken the prep cook Tomas mentioned something like ... that if the knife is too sharp it could cut into bone which could then be included with the fish portions/filets. I suspect this would then require extra prep work to remove the bone pieces.   I have experienced this fileting salmon with a sharp Victorinox filet knife... made a poor decision on where to cut and ended up cutting into the backbone versus sliding on top of it.   The prep room I...
Are J style knives better? I guess so based on the experts and J knife vendors.   I try and judge a knife by how it can do it's intended task without caring where it's made, sold or what the steel is. I don't care if it can cut paper, shave, made of VG whatever, or have any HR rating at all.   Can it julienne a tomato? and if so then I'm OK with it.   At work I use a work owned Dexter 10 inch Chef's knife for 95%+ of what we need to prep.. which can be as...
At work with larger boards and bigger prep jobs, I use 10 inch Chef's knives.. more recently Dexter knives.   At home with smaller prep, smaller boards (and with a knife roll of various other knives), more often than not I reach for this Chinese made western style knife which is 7 5/8 on the blade side, 8 inches to the bolster area.   It's light, thin, and works as needed to do general prep...
Yep a bit of duplication there, but if you are into it as a hobby then "need" is probably not a consideration.   For 95%+ of my prep work I use a 10 in. Chef's (8 in. at home), a serrated bread knife, a Y peeler, and a pocket knife with a 3 inch blade.   I have a Chinese Cleaver and other knives but I couldn't tell you the last time I used them. I believe most Chinese Cleavers are not bone hacking knifes. Most I believe are lighter and intended to be used for...
In addition to what has already been mentioned, non J knife options include traditional Slicers and Carving knives, Fillet knives, and Salmon Slicers. Dexter Russell and Update International also have their versions sold by restaurant supply vendors.
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