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Posts by Twyst

We had one for a while at Uchi here in austin for a while, but it is definitely a rarity. (Uchi is considered by many to be the best sushi/japanese food currently available in the US)
We slice/portion roasted belly when its cold and just warm/crisp up the slices in a saute pan for pick up.   We really have no issue with keeping a crisp skin that way.
One handed quenelles just look better for things like ice cream/whipped cream.  Instead of being three sided a really well done one handed quenelle is rounded all the way around and are nearly egg shaped.  There are lots of different methods to achieve the one handed quenelle but the vid below shows you a great end result.  
CMC exam is no joke, I didnt realize there were actual working chefs who bothered to try to get it anymore.   There are only like 60 of them in the US, and most of them are culinary instructors from what Ive been told.
I think the omelette test is valid.  It's not so much about the end result as it is about watching how clean they work and attention to detail/proper use of heat.   My chef uses the 2 egg and onion test.   Poach an egg, fry an over easy egg, julianne half the onion, dice the other half, then caramelize the onion.
http://www.cheftalk.com/f/79/the-camp-cook
Answers are going to vary a ton from state to state.  Where are you?
Not only your place!   Worked in a great kitchen a few years ago that made EVERYTHING from scratch and it was all really very good, and the restaurant was always packed.   Perhaps the burger was a little too good as it really brought down check averages as it was easily the most ordered thing on the menu, especially at lunch.   We just had to add a bunch of available mods and have servers push them to offset the lower check average (pork belly/avo/foie etc)
Our prep and production team usually works 8-4 M-F.  Pay sucks, but the schedule is great.
Restaurants are probably not going to be for you.  Luckily there are a ton of other jobs out there in the culinary field.     You should stay online for a couple of years even if you hate it though as the experience will definitely help you when you move into another area of the culinary field.   Catering/production cook/personal chef/foodwriter etc are all other areas that may suit you better.
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