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Posts by DenverVeggieNut

Good info, thanks! I'm sure others will chime in with more detailed information and specific recommendations, but I'd just like to reiterate my excitement about the experience you have ahead for yourself for sharpening, whatever knife you get. Learning to put your own edge on is a great skill, and will serve you well going forward...
You've got a good start on things in knowing what knives you need- your core set is most people's core set. Your budget will get you pretty far, too. Very nice gyutos can be had for $200-250, and petties and bread knives are less. The key thing is to get a knife that works with your workflow in the kitchen and cutting style, and then learn how to sharpen it yourself. Do you like to rock chop a lot? Is wiping down a knife frequently and cleaning it before you sit down to...
Gesshin Ginga in white #2, $250. I remember seeing one used in 270mm for $180. Shoulda jumped on it. Love me some white #2. Haven't used the gyuto, but love the Ashi Cleaver (also maker of Ginga) in white steel.
A gyuto is all you need for veggies.
Jason- Yep, that would likely be a good way to go. I can't speak to the deba for filleting fish, but the gyuto is a good all-purpose knife. Popular lengths are 240mm and 210mm. And then for sharpening, you could get either a King combination waterstone for $45.50:http://www.amazon.com/King-Combination-Waterstone-1000-6000/dp/B0037MCLLO/ref=sr_1_6or a medium-grit 1200 stone for $28http://www.amazon.com/King-Deluxe-Medium-Grain-Sharpening/dp/B0016VE6D4/ref=sr_1_10 With a...
German knives and cheap Chinese knives are often offered in discounted sets from big retailers, but if you want to move up in quality from that, you're better off buying the knives individually, and such knives generally don't come in sets anyway. Most people find they do well with just a handful of knives. Most important is the general kitchen knife- usually a chef's knife (the Japanese borrowed this style knife from the west, made it with harder steel, and call it a...
I had an ITK petty for a year or so. I don't think careful use of a ceramic rod will hurt it, but I don't think I'd buy a ceramic hone just to use on this knife. I've got both a ceramic hone and also a balsa-wood strop with CBN (Cubic Boron Nitride) solution on it, and I find I use the strop a lot more often. My five knives have Rockwell hardness of 58-59, 58-ish, 62-63, 62-63, and 62, so two kind of medium and three harder. If most of your knives are softer than the ITK,...
Yes, I had the ITK for a good while, about 22 months. I didn't find forcing a patina with mustard was particularly helpful. The core white steel was pretty much OK, but the cladding really reacted with everything. I think it is the impurities in the steel of the cladding. The last straw was when I tried to use warm vinegar to force a patina to try to fix the reactiveness. The vinegar just took off all the kurouchi finish, and left the whole thing even more reactive than...
Hope you are feeling better! Not that obsessing about knives is a bad way to pass an illness... Anyway, the Tojiro ITK could be an interesting entry for you into the J-knife world. I had one of the 120mm petties. It got nice and sharp, but the handle sucked and it was very reactive. So, it sort of shows you a little bit of what is possible, but has you wishing for more. I got the ITK petty, and also a Fujiwara FKM petty. I sold the ITK, but still have the Fujiwara. The...
  1- Yes.   2- It depends on the knife. With some san mai knives, the outer layer can rust very quickly, in a very few minutes. Whereas, I've got a solid white #2 carbon-steel cleaver that i use a bunch. With it, I'm pretty much OK as long as I rinse and dry it before we sit down to eat. The knife will tell you what it needs. See #3.   3- Orange, red, or yellow rust is bad. If you want to go with a patina for easier care, the other colors are OK. It is very hard to...
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