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Posts by CowtownBrewster

Easiest way to think of eggs, for pastry at least, are 'whites=structure and strength' and 'yolks=richness and tenderness'.    Egg whites are almost entirely protein, and as a result will lend strength, a certain forgiveness in mishandling the pastry, a bit of lift in the oven, and some crispiness - too much though, and it can make pastry tough (think angelfood cake).    Egg yolks will make everything richer and tender - they are mostly fat and protein, and will...
Top with herbs and creme fraiche?  My family has a great cheese muffin recipe (that I will go look for at some point soon) that uses dry ricotta - would probably keep the shape nicer than a cheddar.  Alternatively, you could try a savoury sable instead of 'cake', if the guy is just looking for cheese based pastries.  Experimenting is always fun - enjoy the challenge!
One of the bakeries I worked for used to make up several hundred kilos of dry scone mix at a time - flour, sugar, salt, leavening agents, and fat (shortening).  Then we'd just take how much we'd need for the numbers for the day, eyeball eggs and buttermilk to add, and then throw in a handful or two of fruit or cheese.  If your friend works in a similar way, the '2 eggs' and cream might be an 'add as you go' part of the recipe, for small batched of the larger dry mix. ...
Gah - it's a pain how real life can get in the way of interesting conversations sometimes.  Thanks Chinacats - I was in fact looking at the nogents when I asked about carbon knives.  Which would you choose for yourself, between a Sab Nogent or a Mac Pro?  Are the honing and sharpening regimens similar?
Also, and I fear I am opening yet another can of worms with this; should I even bother looking at classic French carbon knives, or is KISS (keep it simple, silly) my best course?
Wow!   Deputy, thanks for the insight.  I was paying pretty close attention to how I grip my knives today, and realised that you're probably right - I use the handles to steady and support more than anything, and I rarely if ever actually have my fingers wrapped round.  If, by your word, if it's mostly a matter of aesthetic I'd probably still prefer yo.   IceMan - it is great to hear such an enthusiastic advocate of VF.  To clarify, when I was working abroad and...
Thanks Chinacats - you've brought up questions I didn't even think to consider!   Carbon vs. SS - I'm not bothered by regular maintenance, but I am wary of jumping whole-hog into knife maintenance from 0-mach 6.  My biggest concern is damaging a new blade through ignorance of maintenance routines.  Apart from that, I really have no preference.  I should make note that I am a vegetarian and practically never deal with meat at work, so it doesn't matter how the knives...
Hey margcata - this is a great topic, and I'm so impressed by your descriptions coming from a non-beer drinker!  It'd be awesome if we could finagle a beer and food pairing forum in addition to the wine consideration (=D).   I am also a brewer, and actually trained, worked and lived in the UK until quite recently.  I'd love to set a couple details straight, and add my two cents to the pot.   Ale and lager are two different names for the same thing; beer.  The...
This probably should have been my first post - oops!   Hello all, I am a 22-year-old jack-of-some trades.   I started in the hospitality industry working as a baker at a local cafe. Then I moved to England and got a Uni Diploma in Brewing Technology (yes, beer). I worked for two seasons in a remote hotel in the Scottish highlands as a pastry chef, under a Michelin Star chef - talk about a learning curve! And then I had an incredible opportunity to work with...
Jelly, are you talking about daifuku?  Mochiko dough rolled around bean paste?   http://veganyumyum.com/2009/03/daifuku/   This recipe really does work best in the microwave - the stovetop doesn't heat as evenly through the mochiko, and use LOTS of starch (I prefer potato, personally) to stop it from sticking.   You can also get hard pre-made kirimochi at health-food stores, that will puff up when baked or fried - like what's put in shiruko (sweet azuki soup).
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