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Posts by salparadise

 No, it's mostly a matter of aesthetics. I am sensitive to aesthetics, maybe even a bit anal sometimes, about some things. It doesn't much bother me that my $39 dutch oven is stained, but if I pony up for the Le Creuset I don't want it to look the same after a few months. It's a lifetime investment and I would prefer that it look nice, which enhances my enjoyment overall. I have a friend who has one that's badly stained and my first thought was, uh, that it is not...
 Interesting! I appreciate the insight. I did some googling and see that the Staub is interior is dark. They emphasize that the enamel is a durable matt finish and does not discolor. User comments support that assertion. I'm finding mixed reviews on the current Le Ceuset interior. I know that older ones stained, but what I don't know if whether they've changed the enamel and made it more stain resistant. Some descriptions allude to that but don't elaborate. As much as I...
 I have quite a bit of Tribute clad cookware including an eight quart stock pot. You're right about stainless being durable and easier to maintain, but the enameled cast iron is in a class by itself for certain applications and I see it as an essential piece. My Tramontina 6.5 quart is perfectly functional, so it's not a matter of choosing between types. I'm just trying to justify grabbing this Le Creuset at a bargain price. Stain resistance would be a reason, and I must...
I have a chance to pick up a Le Creuset 7 1/4 quart dutch oven at a bargain price. $199, new, not a second. I have a Tramontina 6 quart that I've been using for about 3 years and it is stained inside. I cleaned it by soaking in a water/bleach solution (and scrubbing) and on the next use it stained agin immediately. I paid $39 for this dutch oven and it performs extremely well (ranked close to LC in cooks illustrated test, now discontinued).   So I guess I'm willing to...
For me, decent cookware and kitchen tools make the difference between truly enjoying the experience vs. dreading and avoiding. You can always argue that you don't literally "need" a better pan, but thin stainless is simply not in the same class with aluminum, copper and clad with respect to steady, even heating.   We all have different thresholds. There are folks on here who buy All Clad, Demeyere, and Mauviel, and others who are happy with the cheapest thing that will...
Nobody ever complained that my green beans tasted like they were cooked in 40 year old Revereware pot, but the six-hundred or so that I spent on clad cookware has made life more enjoyable. For those who either can't tell the difference or can't bear the thought of parting with a few extra bucks, there's a store just for you... it really is as much about enjoying cooking as anything else.
  It appears that your stockpot is all stainless and not a disk bottom type. The saucier will give you a chance to test drive tribute. I'm sure you will like it. When I was trying to decide which pieces to buy I chose the 16 quart stockpot over the 12 quart because they are the same diameter, but the 16 is a few inches taller. No point in buying both and I'm good with the 16 quart even though it doesn't get used every day. I had 8, 12, and 16 in the Calphalon. Since the...
 Well, I'll have to respectfully disagree. I own the Tribute 8 quart stockpot, and I previously owned a Calphalon 8 quart anodized (tall, narrow). I find the shape of the Tribute 8 quart to be considerably more versatile. Of course that assumes that you're not planning to use it exclusively for making stock. The wider bottom is better for sautéing, browning meats, cooking spaghetti (which is 10"), making soups, and many other things where you want better access...
  Aluminum will absolutely warp on an American electric stove!   The good thing about aluminum though, is that you can take a hammer and a block of wood and beat it back to slightly concave and it will at least sit flat on the stove again. Not ideal, obviously, but better than bowl shaped. I had a large Calphalon anodized saute that warped and I beat it back and I used it that way for years.
I think you'd be happy with Tribute. I replaced Calphalon anodized with Tribute. I have the sauce pans you listed, plus the 6 quart sauté, 8 and 16 quart stock pots. They meet my needs. Skip the 3 quart sauté and 8 inch fry pans unless you know you'd use them for something specific. I didn't buy Tribute fry pans - I have three De Buyer carbon steel pans, 12.5, 9.5, and 8 inch. Also have a 10 inch cast iron. These do everything I need a frying pan for, considering I have...
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