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Posts by ChicagoTerry

Velveeta was banned in my house growing up. Mom was a health food nut way before it was fashionable and it was full of weird fats and artificial color.   I do remember eating it at a friend's house, probably during a muchies attack after smoking,,,you know. Anyway, we forgot we had put the toasts under the broiler and by the time we remembered, the Velveeta had turned crusty and almost black on top but had stayed melty and gooey underneath and I remember thinking it was...
How did it go? I make an overnight pork butt that starts a 475 then gets turned way down to 200 and roasts slowly overnight. It is divine but it is a PITA to clean the pan afterwords because of the sugar in the marinade. It pools in the corners and turns into a substance resembling thick glass. Still, so worth it to wake up to the smell of slowly roasted pork.
When I have a ton of basil I always make an almost-pesto with just basil leaves and olive oil. I freeze it in ice cube trays and then I have "fresh" basil in the dead of winter. It preserves the flavor much better than just freezing the leaves.
Mike9!   Greektown! Hellas! I remember trying to make saganaki after eating it at Hella's for the very first time...probably 1979 or 1980! I almost burned the house down. Learned my love of Middle Eastern food in the Detroit area, too.
Chicken livers are delicious, though I think I would have not liked their richness when I was a child. I put them under the chicken when I roast one and then eat it, soaked in the chicken fat. So delicious.   Beef liver is a different thing altogether. We were forced to eat it--only occasionally, thank god--but I would never, ever make it now. I still object to the smell and the flavor still haunts me, and not at all in a good way. Yuck.
I think someone is confused about the difference between fermentation and distillation.   Liquor cannot turn into wine. Wine is a fermentation process, dependent upon yeasts, which are living organisms. You open a bottle of wine and the yeasts perk up because of the oxygen and carry forth the fermentation process. Wine doesn't "spoil" as such. It turns into vinegar as the yeasts feed off of the sugars. Wine is a living thing.   Hard liquor is distilled, It is a...
Just one reference I found of several from textbooks on food preservation and safety.   A quote from Food Microbiology , 5th Ed by William C Frazier, Dennis C Westoff, K N Vanitha:   "The aging of distilled liquors in charred oaken barrels or tuns is a chemical rather than a biological process...There should be no problems of spoilage of distilled liquors by...
Try new things all the time, especially when you have the opportunity to eat out. I especially owe my cooking skills to a passion for ethnic restaurants and markets. I've learned so much about flavors and techniques from eating at little mom & pop ethnic joints and reading ethnic cookbooks, then making an effort to replicate those flavors at home.   Shop at farmers' markets, fruit markets, ethnic markets for the best produce, herbs and spices, and, often, the best meats...
Not exactly odd but my mother's family was Hungarian and I grew up thinking there was something wrong with food that didn't have a heavy dusting of paprika on it. Everything got the treatment, even though the tinned paprika available in grocery stores when I was a kid had virtually no flavor to speak of. I was well into adulthood before I realized that potato salad was not usually a pink food and it took even longer for me to look without suspicion at an un-dusted piece of...
I have never had an open bottle go bad or make me sick and I am a very slow at-home drinker. A bottle of bourbon usually lasts me well over a year. I have several fruit-flavored liqueurs and a bottle of cognac that are even older, since I only use them for flavoring the very occasional cocktail or in baking. Never, ever had a problem.
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