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Posts by chefmikeski

If you don't think the production location of high quality butter is the inspiration for the naming of this sauce, I'm interested to hear your theory on why the names Isigny and Hollandaise were chosen for its titles over the past decades? Also, am I to understand that you are actually seeing the word clarified in the Hollandaise recipe in the Cracknell and Kaufmann translation? I, as well, find it strange that I would be inpossession of some sort of mutant copy...or...
Kuan,   Give this a try...place two egg yolks in a clean, small saucepan. Add approx. 1 tsp lemon juice, 1 tsp cool water, a pinch of salt, white pepper, and cayenne. Whisk to combine. Next, add 4 ounces of cold, cubed butter to the pan with the yolk mixture. Place the pan over medium low heat, and stir gently but continuously until the butter melts and the sauce begins to thicken. Pull the pan from the flame, and keep whisking...sometimes the residual heat will...
We teach our students to use clarified butter for roux...eliminating the possibility of burning the milk solids in a darker roux.
Isn't "splitting hairs" part of what is so enjoyable and educational about participating in these discussions? Dave, does your French language version of Le Guide by any chance include a recipe number with the Sauce Hollandaise entry? It's interesting to me that a book such as this that was designed to be such a static,codified, referencetool  for experienced cooks has different editons with different reference numbers for the same recipe. In the Cracknell and Kaufmann...
Interesting...apparently this debate comes down to the particular version/translation of the Le Guide from which one is reading. Although, it can be agreed upon that there is no mention of clarified butter in either translation. Does Petalsandcoco own the Cracknell and Kaufmann translation?...there are obviously some interesting differences in the particular wording of the technique, and I feel that I trust this version as being more true to Escoffier's original intent...
Dave,   Le Guide Culinaire is the same book as The Complete Guide to the Art of Modern Cookery, is it not? I have a couple of them as well. The recipe transcribed by Petalsandcoco does not seem to be truly "verbatim"...his/her own words pepper the recipe and MOP, and I do not see the word "pour" anywhere in Escoffier's original Hollandaise recipe when butter is added to the egg yolk and vinegar reduction base. And, as much as I love Michael Ruhlman, just because he...
Dave,   Page 21, recipe number 119 in Escoffier's The Complete Guide to the Art of Modern Cookery...as I quoted before: "whisk continuously over gentle heat whilst gradually adding soft or melted butter"...so on and so forth. Please tell me what Escoffier book it is that you're reading where he has actually written the words POUR and CLARIFIED butter in regards to his Hollandaise recipe.   Mike
Dave,   Are you looking at a copy of the book as you write this? In his Hollandaise recipe, Escoffier writes "softened or melted" butter...a.k.a. WHOLE butter. The subtle and very specific individual flavor characteristics of whole butter are removed during the clarification process, rendering all clarified butter more of the less the same in the flavor department. Hence, it stands to reason that a sauce that is intended to showcase the superior flavor a particular...
Escoffier's recipe actually calls for leaving the yolks and vinegar reduction over a gentle heat while "gradually adding the softened or melted butter, ensuring the cohesion and emulsification of the sauce by the progressive cooking of the yolks." The beautiful thing I've discovered about making the sauce this way is it's increased stability and willingness to be allowed to cool and repeatedly re-heated for saucing a plate...great for solving the problem of the best way...
Nowhere in Escoffier's Sauce Hollandaise recipe does he call for clarified butter...whole, softened or melted WHOLE butter are the only "classic" choices because the sauce was meant to be a showcase for the wonderful flavor of top quality butter. So many chefs these days (even culinary school instructors) will tell you without a moment's hesitation taht clarified butter is the "classic" choice, and it really frustrates me. I'm not able to find any documentation as to...
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