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Posts by PovertySucks

I was going to say the same thing.  Antiquated cookbooks with obscure directions and measurements usually have flavors that classically pair together.  Maybe ones we've forgotten, and on the plus side, you can use your knowledge of modern techniques.  There's a whole world of modernizing those forgotten classics that can be done.  That whole project with New York libraries is amazing!   For instance, I have been toying with classic sandwiches (for staff meal) and...
Elitist.  Pure and simple.  Not only will you need to purchase the books, but almost all of the recipes call for chamber vacs, immersion circulators, rotary vaps, and a whole pantry of chemical additives that were previously relegated to industrial food prep factories.  And the ridiculous use of plastic bags for absolutely everything.  I thought we were supposed to reduce our use of that stuff?!  Regardless, that's a butt-load of money without even figuring food or labor...
I had a similar problem when trying a mascarpone panna cotta--even with a fairly tepid cream/gelatin mixture.  It is definitely because standard US brands of mascarpone are cheap and only suitable for cold preparations.  If you want a cheese that can stand up to light whipping and some higher heats without separating, try Chef Bo Friberg's recipe for mascarpone:   Tartaric Acid Solution Yield: 180 ml   1/2 cup (120 ml) water, hot 4 oz (115 g) tartaric...
Chefs,   So I have been unearthing old cake recipes lately, and I've got a few good ones where I'm happy with the flavor, but they're not really fit for a plated dessert.  It's kind of like that movie Encino Man--you've given your caveman a bath and taught him how to use the toilet, but he still needs one of those rad early 90s haircuts and some bodacious threads.  Will you be my Pauly Shore and that short dude from Lord of the Rings?   Worst analogy...
This is a late response, but I've found a couple of helpful tricks when poaching eggs:   (1) Place a plate at the bottom of your poaching pot and fill with the preferred amount of water (and vinegar if so desired).  This keeps the bottoms of the eggs from coming into direct contact with screaming hot metal. (2) Heat to around 180F, and get your mise ready: SS bowl, spider, slotted spoon, ice bath, timer.  You won't need to swirl the water but should make sure the...
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