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Posts by PovertySucks

Man, I didn't think I was coming off as that bad.  I didn't say I was sabotaging anything or making service slow or food bland.  It was just a word of warning and a way of pointing out how strange these two hypothetical workers were.  Disorganized but willing versus talented but lazy?  Those are not real people or at least not fully fleshed out.   My example, myself, being qualified to work in a burger joint but not really having my heart in it.  I'm still cooking good...
Hear me out.  I'm not saying, "I don't work hard because I'm great and this job is beneath me."  It's more subtle than that.  I'm trying to explain a very long and difficult lesson I have learned over the years.  It's easy to be taken advantage of if your only concern is doing a job as best as possible.  You have to also look at what you stand to gain and whether a particular job is benefiting you in the long run.  It took me a long time to decipher the difference between...
People are more complicated than that.  Sorry.  Are you fishing for a particular response?  I, for instance, will not work harder than required for people that do not appreciate it or reciprocate in any way.  It is my right to decide how much of myself I give and what I am happy getting in compensation.  Everybody is an opportunist; it is your job to find ways to help people while motivating them to help themselves.
I tend to steer away from dried herbs for this one.  They don’t seem traditional and if they’re out of balance, they remind me of how canned sauces taste.  However, I include garlic in my sachet, so what do I know about traditional anyway…   I use a sachet or sachets of: crushed garlic clove, bay leaf, black peppercorn, parsley stem, parm rind, and fresh thyme.  Additionally, I really believe in a mirepoix/pancetta mixture cooked in butter (add and season in stages),...
We have a very similar process.  I don't want that funky albumen in my veal stock either. Gotta blanch the bones!  Amen.  Of course, if you don't roast the veal but do everything else the same below, it makes a mighty fine stock, too.   1.      Bring veal bones and trotters right below a boil.  Drain, dump, and rinse.  Reserve trotters (half for first run, half for the remi). 2.      Roast veal bones.  If I have time, I tend to go at a lower temperature for longer. ...
I started doing prep at a new "Italian" restaurant earlier in the week.  After the first day in the kitchen, I knew I was in for trouble when they were putting everything in plastic bags, didn't have any saute pans, sheet pans, containers, etc.  One of the owners went blind with rage when I questioned why we were not dressing our salads or why we were using a microwave (Chef Mic) for no less than four menu items.  Long story short, it ended up being a bunch of home cooks...
A la Minute, why would you ever salt capers?!  That reminds me of salting bacon--which I had to do one time with a house-cure that wasn't correctly made.  Man, that was the only time I'll thank the Brunch Gods.  Get rid of this sub-par bacon!  Enter: hungry butthole foodies.  As for the crispy capers, the oil wasn't hot enough.  And be sure to fry in small batches and drain well.  They are incredibly awful stale or oily.  Or you could even tempura a caper berry.  That...
I was going to say the same thing.  Antiquated cookbooks with obscure directions and measurements usually have flavors that classically pair together.  Maybe ones we've forgotten, and on the plus side, you can use your knowledge of modern techniques.  There's a whole world of modernizing those forgotten classics that can be done.  That whole project with New York libraries is amazing!   For instance, I have been toying with classic sandwiches (for staff meal) and...
Elitist.  Pure and simple.  Not only will you need to purchase the books, but almost all of the recipes call for chamber vacs, immersion circulators, rotary vaps, and a whole pantry of chemical additives that were previously relegated to industrial food prep factories.  And the ridiculous use of plastic bags for absolutely everything.  I thought we were supposed to reduce our use of that stuff?!  Regardless, that's a butt-load of money without even figuring food or labor...
I had a similar problem when trying a mascarpone panna cotta--even with a fairly tepid cream/gelatin mixture.  It is definitely because standard US brands of mascarpone are cheap and only suitable for cold preparations.  If you want a cheese that can stand up to light whipping and some higher heats without separating, try Chef Bo Friberg's recipe for mascarpone:   Tartaric Acid Solution Yield: 180 ml   1/2 cup (120 ml) water, hot 4 oz (115 g) tartaric...
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