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Posts by ArikZamoraIRL

I just use an old fashion wet stone with a 1500 and a 2000 side. i got a 6000 grit one too.  I also have a guy come in and put the edge back on my guys knives once every quarter.  But for the most part we all try to maintan our knives with the wet stones or a butchers steel.  i like the F dick steels the best and find that they work great for the Sabatier and Kikuichi knives that i have. Once you get the knack for the wet stones you can get your knives pretty f n sharp....
Im going to go into this conversation saying buy the best materials and equiptment you can without breaking your budget.  I dont know how many seats your going to have or how big your kitchen is so i will just lay out the basics.     1.So to answer your first question- Invest in the stainless stock pots they will last longer (forever).  Keep in mind they are very heavy and if you can get some without the spout on the bottom it would be best with a nice thick bottom,....
There is an old saying.....never trust a skinny Chef. I m 5'8 and am 178  It is important to understand that was said at the turn of the century and that most of those Chefs died at an early age or are in dire health. Look at Santi Santiago who died in his fifties,  and of course Chef Prudhomme who is still alive but had to change his diet around or he would have died.  I this profession it is our job to taste EVERYTHING.  What we need to maintain is control and...
I quit college one semester away from graduating so that i could emerse myself in this career.    You know what i'm never hungry, never thirsty and dont have any regrets.    I'm with Ed too.
i agree with iworktmuch ive had the same 9.5 chef knife for 4 years and it is still sharp as hell.  The good thing about these knive is that they aren t flashy they just work. You can get them in carbon or in a stainless lamanent. Most i got mine on Knife merchant.  It really comes down to what style you like and how hard you are on your knives. Just try some out mix and match.  I myself have a great set of knives that are all different makes. I works for me I chose what...
The best you can do when in any job is be your self and the rest usually follows.  Chef dave is right there has to be chemistry with a crew.  And most importantly listen, watch and do what is needed.  Being relieable and hard working is the most important asset you can bring to any line.  Dont be lazy and ask for a smoke break either.  Z
I have used these before and they are lovely another to try would be the hen of the forest...anyways.  I just sauteed them up and made a Beurre Fondue then added some provance  and sold them as a side dish great pearing with a Vino Verde or a Rose.  you could always use them for a ravioli. they do have to be cut thin. Risotto would be nice add some fresh herbs on the pick up. Yeah well good luck I ho[pe you sell out.  Hasta Lueg.   Z
Hi,  My name is Arik Zamora Im a professional Executive Chef and live in a small town in New Mexico.  I have been in this bussiness for about 18 yrs. I started the odd job in high school as a busser and eventually made the transtion in to the kitchen in college.  Quit college to pursue my love of the food and never have looked back.  Worked under two James Beard winning Chefs.  Was Sous chef for what seemed like forever and just when i was about to quit this oportunity...
Those are really cool looks like alot of work went into those dishes, hats off to you. 
Mmmmm, jalapeno poppers.  I did these for awhile as a special stuffed with goat cheese, aged cheddar,  and bacon.    This is what I did....keep in mind i have a full size frier you can use oil in a thick base pot or one of those home style friers.....and please be careful!! your oil needs to be at 350 degrees.     First I fried the jalepenos whole till they are golden brown Let them cool, then peel them leaving the stem intact. next cut a small sllit...
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