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Posts by Minas6907

Thanks for those photos, very nice. What about making another test batch, but this time add the acid in the beginning. Dissolve it in the water at the very start and proceed with boiling to temp. Also, those are very cool molds, do you mind sharing where you got them from?
Im inclined to say that your pot may be too thin. Can you post a pic? You shouldn't be having any caramel color at 275f. Also, are you adding the citric acid simply as an acidic component for the sugar itself (to make it easier to pull), or is it to add a sour taste to the candy? If its the latter, the citric acid can be added to hard candy after the sugar is poured out on the silpat. Just mix it in with the back of a spoon the same way would would color the pool of sugar...
Its not over the boiling point if he's cooling the pot down in cold water and waiting one minute like he says in the first post Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk
Is the sugar gaining a strong caramel color? Are you sure your only taking your sugar to 300 degrees? If you do not add citric acid, will it not taste burnt? Citric acid will add (obviously) an acidic flavor to the candy, this goes well with fruit and citrus flavored hard candies. Ive honestly never seen the citric acid to be a problem in contributing to a burnt flavor. What are you boiling your sugar with? Are you using a heavy bottomed pot? Glucose and citric acid will...
The oils that specify that they are for chocolate usually contain almond oil. I personally wouldnt use a polycarbonate mold just to be sure the pieces dont have trouble releasing. But the flexible plastic molds would be fine. As far as colors, I personally stick to coloring my own cocoa butters. If you just want to color white chocolate, use a fat soluble powdered color. You can get a set from pastrychef.com, or larger amounts from chefrubber.com. in candy supply shops,...
Do you have a picture of it burning? Ive honestly never seen that. Especially if your dipping the pan in cold water to stop to stop the cooking, I dont think your sugar is too hot by any means. Is your formula just sugar? Any glucose in it? How are the candies finished off? Are they pulled or just dropped? Did this happen just once, or is it something that happens to you consistently? Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk
What kind of oils did you get? Im not sure if a pure oil (like an orange oil) would act the same as thw candy oils from loranns, which are usually propolyne glycol based. Also, what kind of molds are you using? If you using the flexible and more common 'candy molds,' it should be fine. I really cant say if you'd be able to use a polycarbonate mold for molding solid pieces that have an flavoring oil added to them, im inclined to say stay away from that, im not sure if the...
You'll want to check out Chocolates and Confections by Peter Greweling, that will have more info then you expect. The saltwater taffy formula is reliable, and it has an extremely long shelf life. As for the hard candies, you'd be amazed at the combos possible with colors and different flavors, whether natural oils or artificial flavors. You can go way beyond then classic peppermint cane. Pm me if you have any specific questions. Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk
I apologize for the late reply. Thats funny, I've never seen the final outcome of a cordial that has been wrapped in the cake fondant, but doesnt sound too great! Yes, your totally right, cake fondant and confectionery fondant are two different beasts with two different lists of ingredients. My only advice is to read up all you can, everything in chocolates and confections about the cordials and making fondant, most notably the temps at which you wait for fondant to cool...
Check out the book "The Art of the Confectioner" by Ewald Notter
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