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Posts by Steve TPHC

I have never tasted anything by any cook that tasted like vomit. Some thing very wrong!
Retiring meant downsizing the house. The kitchen became less than half of its former glory. Many items previously at hand, were relegated to the garage or appliance closet. The mixer, perched in the closet precariously on a slide-in-shelf, means moving it needs to be justified against the effort of doing without. The value of a special tool became under scrutiny especially in light of the fact that storing it in the garage often meant moving one of the cars out of the way...
  Vic Bergeron, owner of Trader Vic's restaurant, in San Francisco, brought rumaki into 1950~1960's dining culture. He claimed these toothpick skewered hors d'oeuvre came from Hawaii, with Chinese roots and a Japanese name. These were a favorite of mine when my dad took us to Trader Vic's in West Los Angeles. These are easy to make and batch cook in quantity for guests.     Skewers             3 inch bamboo skewers or toothpicks, soaked in cold water for 20...
I noticed from their product web site http://caputoflour.com/portfolio_item/00%E2%80%B3-pizzeria/ that the flour "Milled specifically for use at temperatures above 700°F". See the datasheet http://caputoflour.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/00-Pizzeria-SPECS.pdf ss
I buy this at the Asian market to make guanciale. Though the resulting meat is leaner than traditional pork pieces, it has a noticeably richer flavor. Seehttp://www.babbonyc.com/ingredient/guanciale/ Good Luck
Seppuku
I think the comments already given have a tremendous amount of good suggestions. Descriptions of the menu item and its preparation are fundamental to their appeal. A good menu is the chance to beat one’s own drum. Louisiana White Gulf Day Boat Shrimp with garlic butter, capers, served with capellini, and Bloomsdale spinach Italian wedding soup may be known to many dinners, but others are going to have to be embarrassed to ask or simply skip it. Bruschetta, from the...
Wine made from grapes indiscriminately grown and picked may produce a wine so tannic and puckering that it must be aged before is sheds (hopefully) some of its unpleasant characteristics. By the time is “matures” four~five years that initial huge fruit forward taste has diminished or vanished.
Many people assume that the longer a wine ages, the better it will becomes. The reality of wine making is many wines are produced from less than fully ripe grapes and aging is required to over come excessively harsh tannins. A great oenologist insures that the grapes are picked at their prime even if that means they may be required to be picked vine-by-vine let alone row-by-row. The operation may extend over the course of days or even weeks. This is a strictly hand...
A lot of good sense here, especially about doing what you like. Here a few tips I have learned over the years from many experts. The higher the cellar temperature the faster a wine ages. The bigger the bottle size the faster the wine ages. Wines from a decent oenologist are more fruit forward if drunk early. The same wine will be more tame with smoother tannins if aged. The introduction of plenty of air (decanting) can help tame the tannins on a lesser vintage. Better...
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