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Posts by Phaedrus

Heston is a culinary god!  No question of his bona fides.  FWIW I think he has a point. Both are important but sometimes I think service is more important than food.  Again, you need both but bad service can ruin good food.  It's hard to have good food with bad service.  Places with bad service get the orders wrong, stuff sits on the pass too long, etc.  As a chef I'm obviously committed to food but it's a waste of time trying to do good food without good service.  It's...
That's great!
Yeah, it's not shelf stable but it will keep a lot longer.  Once pasteurized you can keep it refridgerated for a month.
 Sure.  Again assuming you have cooked the food long enough to pasteurize it then you already have a 6D reduction in the amount of pathogens.  Let's take the example a little past sous vide to actually pressure canning.  Once the food has been sterilized in the jar (let's say an hour at a couple atmospheres @ 235 degrees) virtually nothing is left alive in the can/jar.  At that point you can heat the can, chill the can, whatever- it's safe so long as you don't break the...
There are lots of reasons to sous vide stuff, some good and some not so good- and some of the reasons overlap.  The first reason is for convenience.  You can do things that take a long time by first cooking them sous vide and chilling them, then retherming them when you need them.  The next is safety.  You can do stuff to pasteurize, achieving a 6D or so reduction in the bacteria.  Good candidates are eggs and chicken; you do eggs and still leave them raw-looking in order...
You own the place, you make the rules.  Obviously it depends on the totality of the circumstances but normally I'd be peeved to see a server downselling.  Maybe for a regular customer you're better off letting her steer them to whatever will be satisfactory for them.  But being a server is a bit like being a telemarketer or collection agent.  The best servers understand how to serve the customer's needs while taking care of the business, too.  Ultimately what's best for...
The upside is that since the place is about 105 sets I can do a lot of the cooking myself.  Between my Sous and I we do the stuff that takes some skill (for the most part).  Slowly I'm trying to teach some of this stuff to cooks with varying degrees of success.
I've heard of the mythical cake tester for years but I'm not sure what the point is.  You pretty much get the hang of temps after ten or twelve thousand steaks.
My Sous called in sick in the morning, meaning I had to come in and do brunch short staffed.  We basically got killed, super swamped all morning.  It went out okay but only because I was running 125% capacity for three straight hours.  Then I had to flip things over to get ready for the 'main event", the actual VD night service.  Plus I had sat down with the owner a month ago and agreed that the VD menu would run just VD night but at the last minute he wanted to run it all...
It's so true!  Depending on the market there's always a place for a good cook.  I'm the chef of a restaurant in a town of 5000 in western MN and I will tell you my best line cook here would have been washing dishes at my last gig.  There's just no culinary talent to be had here, at all.  If someone needs a skill I have to teach it to them, no matter how simple.  No one here had ever heard of blanching vegetables, they have no idea how to cook pasta, they can't temp burgers...
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