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Posts by chefpeter

you really need to understand how to write research questions if you are going to find out anything of value, sorry!!!
the fish fillets naturally seperate into 3 each side and then you cut them apart along these seams, generally the top 2 are only served, subject to where you work of course. Obviuosly we are talikng about the larger fish here otherwise carry on as normal
believe it or not as long as you always stir the yoghurt the same way ie clockwise once you've added to the sauce it will not break down. the problem with stiring in all directions is that you structually breakdoen the matrix the youghurt form when it sets. When you stir it the same way you simply unfold the matrix and it will not split
My apologies but I should have introduced my self earlier just so you understand why I am so dogmatic in finding out the answers to my questions. I teach in a university in the UK and one of the courses I have written is a degree in culinary arts[this course has even been franchised to a French college]; the primary aim of the course is the application and comprehension of food science and obviously your book is essential reading. My next question is the use of court...
Ok I can see how the salting waorks and yes it does go all the way to the centre of the meat, are you saying then that the salt will carry the marinade flavour compounds to the centre of the meat [surely the salt would only dehydrates the meat during this process; the opposite process of getting the marinade into the centre of the joint]as well and therefore tenderise the meat without any changes in colour or core flavour? As an aside I deeply appreciate the time you...
i'm sorry but i can't see how any part of a marinade effects more than the first 1 to 2 mm of a joint as to the best of my knowledge no matter how long you marinade the joint for all you can see is surface denaturisation and if you cut this away the meat will just taste of the said meat with no flavour from the marinade. Given that this is the case in my opinion; how can any molecules / ions effect the interior structure of the protein unless they can transmit some form...
just to clarify my thinking as far as i understand acidic marinades only denature the surface of meat or fish and therefore cannot tenderise the product to any real degree. If you put salt in the marinade this will only draw out the blood from the product. It is a total waste of time to put oil in a marinade since meat is primarily water and therfore would repel the oil. If you use a raw marinade the vegetables will only flavour the meat they are directly in contact...
can some one tell me exaclty how this brining works as it does not appear to make sense to me. If you put any meat in a salt, or salt sugar solution the moisture is surely drawn out through osmosis as the thinner solution is drawn into the thicker solution and if anything the longer the soak the tougher the meat gets. I only ever use brining if I want to purge meats of excess blood; ie prior to blanching. If any one can explain thr brining process from a scientific...
I dare so most of us have worked with these kinds of idiots who rant and rave and abuse their staff. All I can say to these people is that it's only food at the end of the day, not life and death! If they think their life is stressed tell them to try working in an accident and emergency department where decisions are really life and death, see if they could cope then. I think not!
yes foams and spumas are all the rage these days. the basic ingredients are a glace, butter and or low fat milk, sometimes additional gelatine is added for stability. The balance of the fat content is essential to hold the foam as too much it wont foam and not enough it will collapse before getting to the customer. Temperature is very important tp create the foam; 55c is required. You will appreciate you cant use red hot plates or food therefore! As to creating the foam...
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