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Posts by Blueicus

Ultimately it depends on the kitchen setup and the type of food you serve.  In a restaurant where the dishes have around 4+ touches and things are plated intricately?  I'd say 5 or 6 is reasonable.  Also depends on cheque average of course.  If they're low then you can't afford as much staff, but if it's higher then you can afford more.  If the room is smaller you can usually make do with a smaller staff than in a room that is larger and you do more bills at once.   At...
Use a pressure cooker
If you're actually filling a role of some sort in the restaurant (be it a chef, sommelier, bar manager, GM, etc.) you should be able to factor into the business a salary for yourself since you're basically replacing a position in your business.  As for labour you're never going to have 100% full labour utilization, people aren't computer processors that you can always just shift around for whatever task's necessary... hell, look at a TV set and look at the number of...
Agreed with the others, as the PC you are there to cater to their needs, so keep it simple and to the point if they want it that way.  As for his vegetarian mother, I too would suggest not to simply leave off the meat on her entree, it's not about pulling fancy tricks but making all the diners feel comfortable with their choices and end up looking like a second-class citizen.  Do an eggplant version for her or a nice mushroom bolognese or something.
Although the OP's post is somewhat vague I do think they bring up an interesting point:  At what point should the chef be absolved from having any ability to cook?  Beyond the costing, inventory, staff management, etc. the chef still has to train staff, keep standards up to a certain level and plan menus.  This at least implies a certain level of cooking ability.  A chef that sends out raw steak as med-well is doing a poor job of setting an example and of quality checking:...
A question for you:  What type of Japanese restaurant is it?  High end?  Casual?  Is it traditional or is it more modern/fusiony?  What's the menu currently like?  In terms of Japanese food if you're talking about high end then you are striving to create cuisine that is simple, yet elegant.  Focus on a few ingredients in the Japanese canon, focus on a couple flavours you want to pair and accentuate then present it in a minimalist fashion.  You don't need fancy equipment to...
This issue is really more of one that's systemic to kitchens worldwide than in the US in particular.  I'm pretty sure Michelin-starred restaurants around the world have their cooks and chefs putting in similar hours.   As for the idealized 40-hour work week it only really works if the service and prep aspect of the job were more divorced from each other.  In restaurants where service runs from 5:30 to 10:30 (sometimes later) and clean-up takes an hour or so it leaves...
Typical buttercream ratios (with meringue) is 3 fat, 2 sugar, 1 egg whites.  That will make it a reasonable sweetness
Sous vide blanching works incredibly well for purple root veg, especially potatoes and carrots.  Also for potatoes cooking them in the skin then cutting them will help them keep their colour.  If you're talking about purple beans you're somewhat out of luck as I've not heard of a good method, though sous vide blanching is probably still your best bet.  Also try oil blanching.
The machines with compressors are always superior to the ones that require you to freeze the bucket.  However, the pacojet works on a different principle because it is essentially a "glorified" ice shaver that basically "pacotizes" a frozen block into a scoop able product.  This means you can packetize anything that is frozen, from sweet to savoury to mousses, etc.  The thing about making sorbets or ice creams with no sugar or stabilizer is that you can't hold the product...
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