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Posts by Blueicus

You can, in fact "teach" your customers, however, it must be done from a position of trust.  I go to certain restaurants to eat the predictable and I go to other restaurants ti be surprised.  Depends on what you market yourself as and how you build your clientele.
All this boils down to is how much is the restaurant currently making and what are the costs associated with it?  If you are doing a certain dollar amount on a weekly basis you can pretty much figure out your labour and food cost numbers.  If your labour numbers are too high then the only solution is to do a higher volume, simple as that.  If your labour numbers are in line to make a profit, then you ask how much the owner wants to comfortably earn, presumably the owner is...
I currently run a tiny kitchen at an upscale vegetarian restaurant.  We seat 18+6 at the bar, seatings from 5:30 to 10:00.  We have a staff of 2 on (including myself) working on average 11-12 hours from prep to close, and a night dishwasher.  We have a small but ambitious menu, 4 induction burners as our only cooking area and a two-shelf convection oven that can fit half trays.  If we cram all the seats the entire service ands turn them fairly quickly we can do about 60...
I think a deep sense of insecurity is essential to becoming a great chef.  Unfortunately that can either manifest in a healthy of unhealthy way.  It usually takes me about 2 weeks to start hating a dish I created and as a result I have a deep urge to change it as soon as possible.
With a lot of media attention recently brought against the restaurant industry and the staffing of women there does seem to be a disparity between women employed as cooks vs. chefs and the ratio of women pastry chefs to savoury chefs.  Women make up 47% of all cooks in Quebec, but on the other hand only 23% of head chefs are women.  This figure is fairly consistent throughout Canada and most of North America.  On top of that, there is the North American perception that...
The fact that you've been there 4 years speaks enough about your record.  Why have you let this person drag you (and presumably everybody else who works for you/him) along for so long, when he doesn't have an inkling to change?
Perhaps my career's been the closest to the OP's situation.  I was in U studying computer science and during the work placements (which were uninspiring in terms of preparing me for a life in the industry) I found myself thinking more and more about a career in the restaurant industry.  By third year I figured that I needed to make the switch so I waited until I graduated, hung around in the town where I went to school and started looking for work.   Of course, I had the...
Frankly, looking at resumes I would rather see that you only stayed a few months at Red Lobster than to stick it out for too long.  Anything you can learn that is particularly unique from such a place can probably be learned in a couple months and everything else can probably be learned in a better way at another kitchen.  You can have short stints on your resume, just don't make it a recurring habit.   Where you work in your early days will invariably shape the way you...
How many children are there?  Can't you give them something else?  Children probably can't put down (nor should they really) 12 oz. steaks with all the fixings, unless they're teenage athletes.
I've travelled back and forth across Canada a few times in the pursuit of my career.  If you're short on money I suggest you do your research before you actually arrive at Portland.  Make a list of restaurants that inspire you and email the chef there.  Build up a list of places you can go stage and/or interview and then pursue them with all the energy and enthusiasm you can muster.
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