or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by LogghiB

I don't agree with most of the original post but I do think that it's become a thing where it is hard to break into cooking (in a city especially) if you are over 20 and white, just because most restaurants in New York, Chicago, Boston, and beyond won't hire a white dishwasher. If you speak English (and god forbid you went to college) and you try to apply for a dishwashing job you'll get a lot of raised eyebrows. It seems the majority of people I know that hire kitchen...
It's not particularly useful for an application of terrines or pates but lamb fat (assuming this is fat you're getting from butchering and not skimmed off of a braise or stock) does really well being brined/cured and smoked to be used as a bacon or a lardon - even the fatty trimmings from the shoulder and whatever can be brined, slow smoked, braised and made into sumptuous salty smoky bits for soups, risottos, or ven studded throughout a torchon of foie gras or head cheese.
Yeah, I'm sure, but I'm just saying that your pocket isn't very sanitary either. I keep a little six pan full of spoons with some water inside for tasting. I guess I don't often find myself tasting something by surprise.
This technique doesn't sound sanitary to me. Why keep a tasting spoon in your back pocket?
I'd probably throw on a terrine of some sort, or maybe a house made sausage. Also you can throw a cast iron pan on the grill and do the crab cakes there if you want to alleviate the workload of saute.
I guess there's a notion of moderation - I don't mind if one of my guys shows up with stubble and uncombed hair. But obviously rolling out of a dumpster and wearing a flea-ridden potato sack is beyond unacceptable. Sending someone home to shave, though? I'd feel pretty silly addressing that issue to a 40 year old Ecuadorian who grills my steaks to pay his mortgage. It's not like he's rubbing them on his face, or kissing customers on the neck. (That I know...
Why not? If the people we are trying to draw into the folds of our business; the people we are trying to feed, have a comment to say about our restaurant why isn't it valid? Are we taking umbrage at the people who have criticisms that are invalid? Or people who just post reviews to stroke their own ego by being able to point out trivial flaws? If someone can type and has an educated palate then I feel they DEFINITELY have the ability to review restaurants. My only...
I strongly disagree with the notion that a person needs to know a lot about food to know what good food is. It's a free method of marketing for your restaurant. People who see it will, probably, know to take reviews (good and bad) with a grain of salt. You'd rather get a good review from a pro than a philistine? Can't someone not be a food writer and still have an educated palate? Aren't we, as chefs, cooking for mostly people who aren't food writers? So isn't their...
I use a linen service for chef coats, checks, DW snap-shirts and server dress shirts. it sort of negates the issue of clean uniforms. I don't mind if someone wants to grow out a beard or whatever - as long as it doesn't affect the cleanliness or quality of their work. Also right now about 30% of my kitchen staff has some sort of formal culinary education - but promotions are typically doled out entirely on a basis of skill and reliability. This is an independently...
In my mind, it is pretty ideal when customers are able to voice what they want to the staff. I definitely encourage them to ask about things they want, or better yet just to voice their tastes so the server can link them up with what they'll like best. The worst that can happen is that we have to say "No, sorry." Some people may strive to execute their product exactly the way they envisioned and that is the most important aspect to them. If that business model works...
New Posts  All Forums: