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Posts by LogghiB

I have, in all my time working, never assumed that someone had it out for me or didn't like me because of personal reasons. It's a bad presumption, no matter how true or false. Do you do good work? Are you reliable? Then there's no problem. When your chef rails on you, is it totally out of the blue or did you actually do something wrong? If it is the latter, then don't chalk it up to the chef having a personal grudge. That's cheating. Take the burden on your back,...
I only use very soft, high-carbon carbon-steel knives. For a very specific reason. Control. I don't care if Ronco sells a lightsaber that will never die, dull, or shine less brightly. I like my knife to get dull. I can control the blade. When I run it over a tri-stone I like to grind the body of the knife to a suitable level of sharpness, but keep it a little rough so that A) I have less chance of cutting off a finger as opposed to just nicking myself, and B) It...
The reason you pinch the side of a chef's knife is so the knife has a decreased chance of slippage. If you're a master chef with wicked knife skills, then well... do what you want. Do you trust yourself that much? The pinch grip is there to correct for user error. Using the pinch grip, your badly angled knife motion can be easily corrected for. Placing your index finger at the back of the blade, the blade can slip to the side and embed itself in your fingers. (and...
Thomas Keller proposes salting a day before hand for larger cuts of beef, served rare to medium rare. I think this is most effective with roasts and braises - your typical 10 - 14 oz. NY strip probably doesn't really fit into the category, particularly as most restaurants cook to the desired temperature of the customer. I always salt meats I use for roasting a day beforehand... I don't use much, however. For typical grill&go cuts I just season before tossing on heat.
Chefs have two major sides to their work. The creative, artistic side, and the militaristic, nuts and bolts side. Kitchen managers are definitely the latter. Exec. chefs straddle both. If you feel you aren't doing enough of the menu design and creative aspects of the restaurant, then just step up and attempt to do it. Write down ideas. Bust balls to get those ideas in there. However, if it makes you feel better now, a nuts-and-bolts, get-stuff-done chef is way, way more...
If you can find a nice paying personal-chef gig with benefits, yeah. Sounds like a scam deal. If you really want to get serious about cooking then you should put some serious time in large, high-volume kitchens... but if you want to skate by with decent money then go for it. However, any bad habits you have in that environment will just fester and grow, as opposed to an exec. chef yelling them out of you. I wouldn't feel bad about the culinary school thing, though. A...
Theft has always been, in my mind, an integral part of the restaurant industry. People steal recipies, staff, ideas, all sorts of stuff. If the chef is that hung up about it you could always just make another copy and give that to him (if you really want the used one) but in my mind the chef should have access to a new copy, otherwise he's obviously running a pretty rocky ship.
If you are totally without moral fiber, go in and load yourself up with wine, hand towels, kitchen aide mixers, etc. until you feel your debts are justly compensated. Then run off into the sunset. A good working robot coupe on e-bay can make up for a bounced paycheck or two. (Depending on your pay, I guess.) It's not like they'll need it where they're going.
Really basic drizzle sauces for plating... Balsamic syrup. Just reduce the vinegar, add a little honey if you're lazy and don't want to wait. (It also gets a little more kick for your product yield, but is a lesser product.) Super dense veal reduction. Incorporate a little reduced blood to give it a nice color. Basil oil/cilantro oil. Just puree fresh herb with oil, strain. But as has been stated, be reserved about plating with this stuff. People may enjoy...
Cheater! Blanch it, robot coupe it, push it through a mesh strainer, season, chicken stock to consistency. (This is how I do it, anyway.) If it's too thin, blanch more. (Too thin is rarely a problem, since you'd have to be adding too much liquid.) Fruit coulis I'll play around with liquids - rice wine for mango, strawberry - verjus for raspberry, tomato, kiwi... etc.
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