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Posts by cookieguy

Since you have made brownies with this recipe this leads me to think 3 things: 1. You changed flour brands or bought a new bag of flour 2. You are not ensuring repeatability 3. You are overbaking (sometimes) 1. If you changed brands of flour or bought a new bag of flour you reset the starting point. I know many people are partial to some very specific brands of All Purpose Flour. Some of the stuff bought in the supermarket is not in that league. Some all...
When a label on a food product reads "sugar" it means sucrose. Whether its cane or beet sourced it doesn't matter. Any other sweetner, ie. dextrose, fructose, invert, etc., must be identified by its true name. If the bag in the supermarket says "cane", it is from sugar cane. If "cane" is not on the bag it is most likely beet although there may be a situation (rare) where the prosessor is sourcing from both types and may even blend (again rare). Both cane and beet...
When a label on a food product reads "sugar" it means sucrose. Whether its cane or beet sourced it doesn't matter. Any other sweetner, ie. dextrose, fructose, invert, etc., must be identified by its true name. If the bag in the supermarket says "cane", it is from sugar cane. If "cane" is not on the bag it is most likely beet although there may be a situation (rare) where the prosessor is sourcing from both types and may even blend (again rare). Both cane and beet...
Although used in the chemical industry both have use in food products as well basically as acidifiers in yeast doughs or fruit fillings. Also as a leavening agent or flavoring agent. Specifically, in gelatin desserts, fumaric acid improves flavor stability and gel strength. Use of these acids would really be limited to commercial food processsors for the most part.
If it's the type of pie you can freeze, fruit or pecan, etc., freeze it completely. Then package the pie carefully as above in its own pie box. Then use the smallest foam cooler you can. Pack the pie box in the cooler taking up all space with whatever. You must include either pre-frozen chill packs, which you can buy in the store, or, better, get some dry ice from the local ice cream distributor. Pack the chill packs or dry ice, maybe 1 pound, in the cooler. ...
There's really nothing wrong with the forementioned recipe if instructions are followed and the proper pans with the proper amount of batter is used. This is a high-ratio formula, in fact, the sugar is 169% in bakers percent using the oz. weights given by Z-BESTUS. This is a little high but not out of the question. Emulsified shortenings are used in commercial bakeries but even more important would be the use of high ratio cake flour. In any case this recipe is...
If both pans were 1-1/2" high, the 9" pan would have a volume of 95 cubic inches, the 10" pan would have a volume of 118 cubic inches or 24% more. So the answer is no. If you put all the batter into one 10" pan you'd have a problem. A 9" round or even a 10" with the proper amount of batter shouldn't take 55 minutes to bake. Try to get away from using toothpicks; there is no professional baker in the world who does this. Toward the end of the bake use your finger...
Since every oven is different baking by time from a book is dicey. The product has to come out when it is done. This takes experience. When baking cakes, muffins, etc. the last part to bake is the top middle. Touch the top middle very, very, very lightly. It should spring back. If you leave a depression it's not done. For really moist products you can even underbake very slightly, especially devil's food. This hold true particularly if you are cutting tops off for...
The cooler bake temp has to be right from the beginning otherwise you lose the advantage.
Bread flour is definitely not the way to go. That is a hard flour with too much protein. Use a formula suitable for cake flour (bleached) if available or a formula geared to all purpose flour.
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