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Posts by foodpump

The times, they have a'changed.  It "used to be" that the Chef of a hotel would stay in that position for years and years--as long as s/he kept their f & l costs in check-- and things were fairly stable.    Most kitchens now have a Chef who typically stays 12-18 mths, with the usual pattern being to push lower f & l costs on the chef, boot the guy out regardless if the figures are achieved, give the position to his junior without a pay raise or bennies, sweat him a bit,...
Oh yeah, this thread..... This one was started by a culinary school graduate that was a career changer. She insisted that she had "over 30 years" cooking experience, but had never worked in a commercial kitchen, ever, and insisted that cooking was the same as a waitressing job she did did 25 years prior. She would argue with anyone that told her different than what she wanted to hear. What arguements! Everything but cooking played a role Brings back memories, this...
Geez   Ross, wish I had your stamina.  After the third run-on-sentence I started scanning down for a paragraph break, and when I couldn't find any,  I just gave up.... 
Spot on with the reducing collar.   Get a 60 qt if you can with a reducing collar with matching bowl and hook for 40 qts.  Having two bowls is like having two mixers, and sometimes you wish you had 3 bowls...   Buy from a local bakery eqpt. supplier for two main reasons:   1) They will (or should) service what they sell.  Not really possible with internet sales     2) When your biz outgrows existing equipment they will/should give you a fair price on trade-in for...
Mmmm.... My experience tells me that if you want flexibility in a ganache, you add corn syrup or honey to it. Some of the places Ive worked at, we had a ganache that was poured on the cake, then frozen, then shipped to a ferry line. Two weeks in the box and the ganache still shone. If you add more fat than the emulsion can handle, (ganache is an emulsion) it will separate. In all my years, I ve never made a modeling chocolate with water in it, though
 Eh..no.  Fat is a solid when cold and is crystalline in structure and it will crack--remember couverture is well over 40% fat, in the form of cocoa butter.  Cream is 33-38% butterfat.  If you want flexibility, you need to add corn syrup or honey.  The cheaper glazes use gelatin or food gums to achieve this Eh...no.  Chocolate is not a crystalline structure.  Chocolate is a partial suspension of solids (cocoa solids, sugar) and fat (cocoa butter).  Chocolate can "hold"...
You need some flexibility in your ganache.  Try subbing 10-15% cornsyrup or honey in place of the cream
This sounds tacky, but it's another arrow to add to your quiver.   Clear plastic clamshell boxes.  They're airtight and display well.  And besides, the counter staff can't make a mess of them like they do with a whole sliced cake.   Mind you this won't work for every setting.  It's great for the after dinner crowd who want a slice of cake to enjoy at home.  I used to put in some nice chocolate decorations and fruit like physalis/cape cod gooseberries, that keep forever...
I've worn contacts for almost 30 years in all kinds of kitchens. I'll take them any day over glasses, any day. Mind you I wore gas permeables, not those squishy, fussy useless soft contacts. It,s not just the glasses fogging up, they get greasy very fast, require often cleaning, slip down your nose, pinch your nose, chafe your ears and temples, and sometimes slip off.
Do a search for I.T.A. Ontario.  ITA stands for the Industry Training Authority, a Fed Gov't body that is responsible for creditation of many of the trades--including Cooks.  The site should give you all the information you need to get started.   Hope this helps
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