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Posts by foodpump

Regular Convection (garland, southbend, us range, blodgett, etc) ovens aren't as fantastic as foodeqpt. sales people make them out to be. They are great general workhorses, but are not perfect for any one particular application. For roasting meats, they'll get the job done, but with one important caveat: You will loose significant weight compared to a deck oven. The fan blows hot air which will lower the humidty in the oven, and this means greater weight loss. For many...
O.k., why only hotels? You say you have owned 3 restaurants. Where did your financial backing come from? With me and my businesses, the banks wanted to see some kind of credentials before lending me money.Look, we're not taking about titles here. We are talking about credentials. If the credentials state that the guy knows what mise en placevis, and he doesn't, you either lodge a complaint with whonis issueing the credential, or you ask the guy if he lost his...
If and when you can proove that your idea makes money, investors will beat down a path to your door. Operative word here is proove.....
Eh, you only need two buttons on a scale: on/off and tare. I scale out maybe 20-30 different recipies every day comprised of multiple ingredients, and believe me, toggling back and forth from metric to idiot (imperial) is a waste of time and frustrating. Many a time I have dreamed of doing nasty things with a meat fork to t he inventor of scales that automatically display in idiot, forcing younto toggle it back to metric every time you turn it on. If you need the ...
Well, some of my favorite tools include a dough sheeter, amazing what you can do with that, attachments for 30-40qt Hobart, the slicing attachment including the power dicer, is a joy in high, high vol.ume kitchens, blast freezers are very handy and a favorite of mine. Vacuum packers are very handy too. Is tjis what you had in mind?
Yeah, but look at it from another point of view: A restaurant's primary goal is to make money. If the kitchen doesn't have a broiler, you grill a steak on the flat top, if its cheaper to buy in fully portioned meats, then you do that. What I'm saying here is that the restaurant has no obligation to teach anything but the bare minimim, and many times the logic and theory is waaaay off(sear meats to lock in flavour, put hot liquids in the walk in to cool down, and other...
Why do you need a fake-ass drivers license in order to drive a car? Why do doctors need a fake ass credential to treat patients?Look the worst excuse in the world is "I don`t know". Any kind of certification-from drivers licenses to culinary qualifications- prevents people from using this pathetic excuse.Or would you rather be a taxi driver in "another country" where drivers licenses dont exist, or are a joke, and people use their horns instead of brake pedals?Smarten up!
Oh dear... You don't need or want an artichoke (aka architect). You need a mechanical engineer to design and sign off on a ventilation system, you might need a structural engineer to sign off for any holes in load bearing walls ( ventilation shafts, a/c and refrigeration lines, p.umbing or electrical lines, holes in the floor slab for grease traps and floor drains) you need a good general contractor with years of restaurant experience to tender quotes and keep on top of...
You have to bear in mind that you will need storage space for at least two racks, one toothed, the other flat. A draining area for the rack is ideal, but not necesary. However, if you leave the door open you will steam up your kitchen, and those machines are very power hungry. You also need to pre rinse the items before loading them in. I don't see the need for commercial at home, they pump out dishes fast, at home you only eat three times a day.
Sharpening is highly personal, but there are a few "rules" that everyone agrees on. One rule is that the higher the grit you use, the finer the surface on the edge will be, and therefore the more durable your edge will be. 300 grit is great for restoring edges, but it leaves a surface full of deep scratches, and these scratches leave a jagged or "toothy" edge. This can be ideal for many things, especially bread or the like. However, this jagged edge will fatigue and...
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