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Posts by foodpump

Well, I guess if the o.p. has a gas range at home, and is willing to put in the labour, andvprovided the pans aren't badly pitted, yeah sure, why not? Thing is, those are alum-lum-lumnimmum pans. Cheap like borscht. They are already warped, so they won't sit flat on an electric or ceramic range,--useless as mammaries on a stud bull, unless you have a gas range, where it then behaves like a mini wok. But don' stop there! The handles are riveted on, and guessy-guessy...
Yeah... I've used them, alot, since the mid '80's. Its not a robot. It roasts, it steams, it can control the humidity inside the cabinet etc. etc. It is very well made and very clean. That being said it is just a piece of equipment, it can't cut, tie, and sear a roast, but it can roast with a minimal amount of weight loss/shrinkage. Where these ovens really shine, where they earn you money, is with rethermalization: You load in a rack of cold, dressed plates--say a...
Nah, no rifle. The Swiss being Swiss, all of us kitchen guys HAD to have a s.i.g. 9mm pistol on us at all times, I mean they'd do snap weapon inspections while we were making breakfast. 'Course, they'd only issue us ammunition at target practice.....
And that, Jimyra, is why I have never even once went on the "wikipedia" site looking for information....
PBullsh*t.Armies are mobile. Prisons and old folks homes are not.Army cooking presents a ton of logistical problems that no prison or insitution will ever have. Its the Chefs job to deal with it.I suggest putting on a uniform and experiencing it for yourself.
Yup. And like I said, butter has around 20% water, eggs have water content too. Hard to say where the moisture problem is withot looking at the formula, but it may not even be with the formulation,What you need to do is follow your haccp procedure from mixing to packaging to transport to the store shelf, and look for potential moisture issues. Condensation is always one of the "usual suspects", but it could be many other things.Of course, you do have a haccp...
Ummm... Pemmican IS N. American, about as american as you can get....The point I'm making with all of the foods I mentioned is that they all have incredible shelf life, years actually. No refrigeration or fancy packaging.needed And yet all of these foods will never develop mold if stored in proper conditionsC'mon now, think! What does mold need in order to survive?Remove that, and you have no mold issues. This is what countless cultures figured out literally thousands...
Say what? I'm not promoting "my business" here, you get the commission, you work for it. Yes, sugar dissolves in butter when you cream it. But butter isn't 100% fat, is it? You got 18-20% water to account for. Do I win a prize for knowing the fat content of table butter? Do you? Look, your client has mold issues, and yet you are talking about fats going rancid. Rancidity and mold are two very separate, distinct issues. Here's another riddle, and one that deals...
Oh, I forgot'   You can beat sugar as long and as fine as you want, it won't dissolve in oil. Neither will salt for that matter. Which is why both are known as "water soluable".    I was taught this in grade 9 chemistry.    Do I win a prize?
My first thought is the following:   If this is your client, and you are charging for advice, what is my cut?   My second thought is that oils do indeed go rancid, but not moldy.  Here's a thought for you:   Water is life. Mold is a form of life.   Countless nations and peoples have been using this fact for countless centuries.   Water can take on many forms.  Condensation is one form.   I guess I'm speaking in riddles, but again, it ain't my client, and I...
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