or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by foodpump

 Uh-huh..."milk is essentially water approaching it's saturation point" Saturation of what? Beans? 98% beans and 2% water? Say 3.5% water for homo milk? Look, two posts ago you were suggesting to ladle hot stock into sheet pans in the freezer, now you're telling me all about hydrostatic pressure and that all water in plastic bottles is poisonous. Just take it easy for the next couple of posts, O.K.?
Eh, no. If your sink stopper is yer usual 12" high s/s tube, and you have less than 12" of liqud in your bucket, the bucket WILL float. And when it floats, it bobs.
I got two problems with stock cooling down in sinks with running water: -The first is that your pail/bucket bobs up and down with the water current and eventually tips over, spilling your contents in the water. -The second is that your pail/bucket bobs up and down and "goes with flow" traveling right under the stream of water from the faucet, diluting and ruining your work. In both cases you can shove a sheet pan across the corners of the sink to keep the bucket from...
From your post, I gather you are located in Europe where floor drains and squeeging the floor are the norm.  N. America, where floor drains are very un-common, the mop and  bucket rule.  Having worked in both continents, I prefer the squeegee method, but if you only have one floor drain, the choice is obvious.   I actually learned how to mop a floor at my first job waaaay back when at Mc D's.  Think of mopping as a sponge bath, the floor shouldn't have a 1/4" of water on...
Yup.  Every step IS a fatal flaw.    Ladling hot stock into a 3/4" deep sheet pan? Better hope the floor in the freezer is level.    Speaking of floors, what happens if you drip a little?  By the time you get the mop the liquid has already frozen, making it a very slippery hazard.    And how do you get the stock out of the sheet pans? They don't come with a spout    All this, regardless of what I just explained what happens when you put piping hot items in a...
I dunno about that immersion thingee...it's a lot of untreated copper surface area.  Heckuva lot of copper to keep clean and shiny, as oxidized copper tends to leave a coppery/metallic taste in your mouth.   As someone who's spent almost 35 years in commercial kitchens, I can tell you that health inspectors prefer the icewand and water bath technique, it works very fast.
Wrong.  Absolutely and emphatically wrong. When you put hot items in the freezer you create a lot of steam.  The steam goes right to the condensing coil--that box up there in ceiling with the fans on it-- where the steam cools down into water, sticks on the coil and turns to ice very quickly.  Now the coil is plugged with ice, the fans can't circulate the cold air properly, and as a result, the temperature in your freezer goes up (gets warmer).  After a while the...
Yup.   It's called an "ice wand". Basically a long, narrow plastic bottle with fins that you fill with water and freeze.  Put your hot stock in a cold water bath, pop the ice wand in, and within 10m minutes it's pretty cold. You can make do very well with 4 ltr (1 u.s. gall) milk jugs filled with water and frozen too.1
You're on the right track.   When you cover a large cake, your coating is thin and the surface area greater, so the choc. cools down very quickly.  With small solid molds, try filling them halfway, refrigerate 5 mins or so, then top off and refrigerate again 5 mins.     If you have the time, one of the best books I can suggest is called "Chocolates and confections" by Peter Grewling  isbn#978 0 7645 8844 0 .  It will give all the information on chocolate, on tempering,...
Are the molded chocs solid or hollow?  How do you cool down the filled molds?
New Posts  All Forums: