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Posts by foodpump

  Hey, Didja ever hear of a professional football/b.ball/baseball player who didn't want to work evenings/weekends/public holidays?  Didja ever hear of such a player who didn't want to play against other teams because s/he didn't like competition? Ed was right, get out of the  kitchen now, you ain't going to like it. 
Best handles, IMHO are Unicorn antler scales fastened with unobtainium rivets.   A paring knife, for me is a workhorse.  I've lost many in piles of vegetable peelings, dropped many down floor grates, managed to leave a few on baking trays and "baked" them long enough to royally screw the knife up.  I use them to slash open boxes, cut, trim, bone out quail, and a zillion other duties.   As a Chef and employer, I buy them by the  dozen and ensure my staff have...
  Mmmm..no....not really.   Maybe with steaks and chops, sure, yeah. But I dare you you to move around sausages on a grill or from a pot of hot water with a fork with sharp tines.  You know, stuff like blood and liver sausages, Bratwurst, Schueblig, Teewurst, Knackwurst, etc, etc.  Do it once, and if  the Chef hasn't whacked you over the head with an open palm, the (deleted) thing will burst open and squirt you good.... As the Germans sing when they get very drunk: "Alles...
Ya beat me to it, Polly... I was one minute behind you posting....
No one perfect tool.   Forks are good for heavy items like roasts (bound with string, of course) picking up whl chickens by the cavity, and the like. Great for some things like spinach and pasta.  Downright sh*tty for steaks and snausages.   Tongs are great for a lot of items.  Yes they do get dirty.  That doesn't mean you should let them get dirty.  They are cheap and you should have a bunch of them for service. Still the best thing for picking up a pie-pan of Fr....
Look, I don't work for the KGB or Nat'l Security, but I have more questions for you.   The first is:   Q:  Why did you fork out the mega-bucks for culinary school if you've never worked in a kitchen before?    (yes technically you worked for a summer in the kitchen 20 odd years ago, but...)    Don't you try before you buy?  You're absolutely certain you'll love it in the kitchen once you graduate even though you have, umm... "friction" between yourself and other...
Here's what 99% of prospective employers will say:   "40 years of cooking experience, eh?  Yet you have no related hospitality industry experience listed on your resume......"  
Hey no problem.   Glad to have you here with us on Cheftalk.   Edward
Yup...All mine.  Hey, you want to help me replace the a/c filters and swap the burned out gu10 halogen bulbs in the dining room Sunday night?  ..
  Advertising pic....
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