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Posts by foodpump

"Boils down tonthe quality of the rep..." Absolutely! Thing is, I don't have any "juicy accounts" in my area, those are all in the downtown core. That means the newbie rep gets the smaller accounts, which are in my area, and in my 30 odd years in the biz, I've never had newbie rep who actually knew what they were doing. That doesn't mean the reps can't/ won't learn o.t.j. . But here's the kicker:They learn at my expense. Once they are competent at their jobs, they...
Isinglass is a gelatin, made from the float bladders of certain fish, also used as a glue--gelatin and hide glue are very, very similiar. But if everyone thinks Peyerson's book is great, why am I the only one highlighting his stuff?
In regards to 1), You have to factor in scum, a.k.a. dead protein, that comes from bones and meat. The older the protein you use, the more scum it will throw off. Like I said in my pevious post, this coagualtes in large chunks at around 60-70 C. These chunks will quickly disintigrate into small particles and cloud the stock if not removed quickly. As also mentioned in previous posts, lower temperatures extract more flavour than higher temp. Aa In regards to 3), ...
Ummm, lets not get ahead of ourselves here.   Beer is beer.  It does not contain fats or gelatin.  Stock does.   I don't see what the big fuss is about.  Bring your cold stock to a boil, turn down the heat, and skim off what floats to the top.  After about 30 minutes, you don't need to skim much.  I don't see what advantages a pressure cooker offers over an open pot,  for the at  home cook, an open pot stock would take maybe 3 hrs max, ice bath another 20 minutes, and...
Here's the thing: To make a clear stock doesn't cost any more than a cloudy one. True, it takes a bit more effort--more mental than physical,-- but clear stocks have been made for hundreds of years. For professional cooks a clear stock is a matter of professionalism. Another way of looking at it is this: I've explained what scum is, it has no nutritional value, and doesn't contribute good taste or texture. So why include it in your stocks?
Not really, if you look at some older books like Escoffier and Larousse, there are several recipies for mayo and dressings using hard cooked yolks. Can't say as I've ever tried it though.
After 35 years in the biz--20 of them running my own show, I can tell you this: Giants play gest with giants, and dwarves play best with dwarves. Thus, if you're a 500 room hotel with 6 f&b outlets, the big boys will give you good prices and good service. If you're a 50 seat place, the big boys will whine about "minimum orders" for deliveries and really screw around on pricing, and make you buy everything from coffee to toilet paper., and really try to screw you over on...
 Here's an experiment:Take two identical teabags, drop one in a cup.  First cup you fill up with 100 C boiling water, the other cup with 75-85 C water.  Wait a few minutes. Which cup has a weak, muddy flavor?  Which cup has a clean pronounced flavor.? You get the best extraction  flavours well under the boiling point.  Any coffee machine expert/repairman can tell you that. The times for simmering a stock are directly proportional to the size of bones and cut of vegetables...
Firstly, lets discuss "flavoured water" For me, flavoured water is the pot on the back of the stove, catch-all for all manner of veg trimmings, meat trimmings, etc. This stuiff is ideal for making risotto, for deglazng pans, or for thnning out soups, but it is not stock, its flavoured water. Its good stuff, ideal and practical use of scraps. but it is not stock. Now, if I were to make osso bucco that I'd sell for $29.00 a pop, I'd use a stock, properly made with...
[quote name="eighty-sixed" Personally, a good stock IS a clear stock. Any stock (I made) will be strained few times to remove as much scums/shits in it. Those are the things that made it bitter or taste funny. Wrong. Wrong theory, wrong explanation. Your window of opportunity to remove scum ( dead protein) is when it coagualates and floats to the top. As soon as it forms clumps it should be removed, otherwise those clumps will break apart into fine particles. And...
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