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Posts by foodpump

Yup.  Every step IS a fatal flaw.    Ladling hot stock into a 3/4" deep sheet pan? Better hope the floor in the freezer is level.    Speaking of floors, what happens if you drip a little?  By the time you get the mop the liquid has already frozen, making it a very slippery hazard.    And how do you get the stock out of the sheet pans? They don't come with a spout    All this, regardless of what I just explained what happens when you put piping hot items in a...
I dunno about that immersion thingee...it's a lot of untreated copper surface area.  Heckuva lot of copper to keep clean and shiny, as oxidized copper tends to leave a coppery/metallic taste in your mouth.   As someone who's spent almost 35 years in commercial kitchens, I can tell you that health inspectors prefer the icewand and water bath technique, it works very fast.
Wrong.  Absolutely and emphatically wrong. When you put hot items in the freezer you create a lot of steam.  The steam goes right to the condensing coil--that box up there in ceiling with the fans on it-- where the steam cools down into water, sticks on the coil and turns to ice very quickly.  Now the coil is plugged with ice, the fans can't circulate the cold air properly, and as a result, the temperature in your freezer goes up (gets warmer).  After a while the...
Yup.   It's called an "ice wand". Basically a long, narrow plastic bottle with fins that you fill with water and freeze.  Put your hot stock in a cold water bath, pop the ice wand in, and within 10m minutes it's pretty cold. You can make do very well with 4 ltr (1 u.s. gall) milk jugs filled with water and frozen too.1
You're on the right track.   When you cover a large cake, your coating is thin and the surface area greater, so the choc. cools down very quickly.  With small solid molds, try filling them halfway, refrigerate 5 mins or so, then top off and refrigerate again 5 mins.     If you have the time, one of the best books I can suggest is called "Chocolates and confections" by Peter Grewling  isbn#978 0 7645 8844 0 .  It will give all the information on chocolate, on tempering,...
Are the molded chocs solid or hollow?  How do you cool down the filled molds?
You can melt whole slabs or coins in the melter over a 18 hr period, no need to microwave it.  It's actually easier and far less messier this way.  So yeah, you can set the thermostat to 40-ish and walk away.  For milk couverture I wouldn't go over 45, I would only go as far as 40, but for dark you can go to 45.  If you're not using choc. for a week or so, you just unplug the melter and leave the choc in there, with the lid on.  The day before you need it, plug the unit...
Sigh.....In one ear and out the other........
Gentlemen,   I think we need to keep things a little in context here. The O.P. didn't suffer a screamer Chef on the line, he was taunted by several employees while working in the dining room on a buffet line.  He was a "temp", a rent-a-cook, a gun for hire.   Who knows the reasons why a brigade would want a good pair of hands--taking off extra loads of work from them-- walk out on them.
Cheflayne beat me to it! That,s the #1reason. Others are: . No supervisory skills regarding staff(If you hire a bartender you better know 101 ways to cheat, cause the bartender knows 99) .Ignorance of municipal bylaws- parking, liquor, plumbing, electrical, and especially hvac And at a close #3... .Sh*tty landlords and/or being stupid enough not to get a lawyer to read the lease before signing it.
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