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Posts by foodpump

O.K., this is gonna sound a bit confusing...   1) Hot food should be cooled down as quickly as possible   2) Hot food should never be put directly in the fridge   I usually keep a couple of marble tiles or 2 l pop bottles full of water in the freezer.  When I need to cool something down in a hurry, I pop a few tiles out of  the freezer, set them on the counter, and lay the item on it.  If it's a liquid, I stick in a frozen pop bottle and let it cool down in a hurry....
Dilbert beat me to it...   Not that I'm a big fan of chemicals or spraying, but that (deleted) in the barrel is highly concentrated and in all likelyhood will burn skin on contact.
I dunno.... I'd hate to stereo-type cooks or bakers....
I think F.F. is on the right path.  "Stew meat" is just one tick above "regular ground beef" and is usually from a very lean cut like top round or sirloin tip.   Meat is graded according to "marbelling" or tiny threads/rays of fat interspaced in the meat.  This fat provides a quasi barrier around the meat, making the meat fibers smaller when it melts out.  A better quality of meat, even a tougher cut, like a sirloin tip will have some marbelling.
I had a dream about deconstructing some good old fashioned comfort food the other night...   I dreamt I had just won accolades for my deconstructed Caesar salad.   For the romaine, I had converted the lettuce to juice, then made a caviar with it with my spherification chemistry set.  The balls were scattered around the plate, dribbles and drabs of evoo were artistically arranged, garlic infused lemon peel brunoise lightly scattered, but the center of the plate--ah, the...
When I left Switzerland in '91 we were working 5 days a week,* with the day being split into two shifts, the Swiss loved to call the afternoon break "Zimmerstunde" ( roughly translated as Room hour), never figured that one out.....  Sometimes you got lucky and got the afternoon "Garde" shift and worked through a whole 8 hr shift, but usually it was the split shift.    Doubt if things have changed since then.....       *Don't snicker now, it was only in '82 did the...
 Yeah... I "inherited" a massive 24 x 30 butcher's BLOCK, (that sits on 24" high legs) which was originally 18" thick. When I got it, it was hollowed out so badly I had to chop off almost 7" from the top to get it level again.  All the strips of wood (end grain surface) are dovetailed together, and there are 3/8" redi-rods (all-thread) spaced every 12" as extra precaution. You can't wrap a strip of wood or even a band of s/s around a block made up of tiny individual end...
The first two look great.  I 'd pass on the third, the "professional" model though. When you have a block comprised of 144 individual smaller blocks with only glue and no mechanical joinery (ie dovetail joints) holding it together, and the thing sits in a pool of water it will crack, especially when made with different species (maple, walnut) as each wood will react differently to water. DAMHIKT.....
 Yes... please read my first post, I was the first to respond to the original poster.  I believe my content and yours are very similar.  The only thing I think I should add is that I feel all culinary schools should only taken applicants who have at least 1 yr working experience in the kitchen.
Best method is to fry them on site.  Fried or breaded products do not transport very well, either they go soggy and limp, or stone cold and dry.    If there was a way to "hold" fries for periods of time longer than 10 mins, Mc D's would have figured it out by now.....
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