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Posts by foodpump

 Yeah... I "inherited" a massive 24 x 30 butcher's BLOCK, (that sits on 24" high legs) which was originally 18" thick. When I got it, it was hollowed out so badly I had to chop off almost 7" from the top to get it level again.  All the strips of wood (end grain surface) are dovetailed together, and there are 3/8" redi-rods (all-thread) spaced every 12" as extra precaution. You can't wrap a strip of wood or even a band of s/s around a block made up of tiny individual end...
The first two look great.  I 'd pass on the third, the "professional" model though. When you have a block comprised of 144 individual smaller blocks with only glue and no mechanical joinery (ie dovetail joints) holding it together, and the thing sits in a pool of water it will crack, especially when made with different species (maple, walnut) as each wood will react differently to water. DAMHIKT.....
 Yes... please read my first post, I was the first to respond to the original poster.  I believe my content and yours are very similar.  The only thing I think I should add is that I feel all culinary schools should only taken applicants who have at least 1 yr working experience in the kitchen.
Best method is to fry them on site.  Fried or breaded products do not transport very well, either they go soggy and limp, or stone cold and dry.    If there was a way to "hold" fries for periods of time longer than 10 mins, Mc D's would have figured it out by now.....
Please read my above post in regards to cooking sugar...
  I don't understand.... Does this mean every Gr. 12 gradate who doesn't go on to college or University has finite knowledge, and isn't expected to educate him/herself about the food that they eat? For the rest of their lives? Or does it mean that every college or University student has this knowledge?  Not just the Health Sciences students, but all students.  Is it required knowledge?  I've never sat for entrance exams to Political Science or Theology, is knowing what...
Got out of the test after it insisted I state how much I earned.    O.t.o.h., I don't buy much joghurt--if any at all, and I don't buy barf-fast cereal either.  I dunno....
Well, not lemonade, but chocolate.  I make 22 varieties of bars for wholesale, and have them in about a dozen supermarkets.  On Friday this week I get a call from one of the stores placing an order, but also asking me to "pick up the expired product".  My bars have a shelf life of 6-9 mths, and I also "check up" on the stores on a monthly basis, noting the expiry dates and informing the dept mngr of what is close to expiry and the odd bar that has past.  While this isn't...
I wrote this on another thread, but it is worth repeating here.   If you stick a probe anywhere in a pot of boiling water, you'll get the same reading anywhere you stick the probe.   With thick, viscous liquids, you'll get different readings depending where you stick the probe: Closer to the bottom will be higher than closer to the surface.  If your hot plate is 6" dia.  and your pot is 8" in dia. you'll get different (cooler) readings closer to the edge of the pot...
Could be a cheap-er cornstarch or even a potato/cornstarch blend causing the trouble.  Looking back, what brands of cornstarch did you use?   I was taught to further cook the pastry cream another 2-3 minutes over very low heat once it thickens so all of the starch granules had burst open.  Even with lumps, the "proper" thing to do was to push the pastry cream through a sieve once cold to remove lumps--this also makes it easier to fold in whipped cream or other...
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