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Posts by foodpump

I just submitted my first "how to" in the article section of this forum. It deals with chocolate figures. This is my first attempt writing this style, I'm not that familiar with loading pics, and I have over 15 of them, and may have scrambled a few of pictures with their texts up. Hopefully, this will be the first of more "how to's" to come. Have a look and see what you think.
How? I hated wearing glasses... Seriously, I had been wezring glasses since around 8 years old. By the time I was 16 I was screaming for contact lenses. Parents said if you want them what's stopping you from earning some money to buy them yourself? In the town I grew up in, in the late '70's, there was only two types of restaurnts, Greek or Chinese. I got myfirst job washing dishes in grade 10, and kept at it until after grade 12. Then I got serious and started in...
Like the others, I hate, loathe, detest, etc. the low temps. Why?   Well, for one thing, you need another chemical, sanitizer, in addition to your soap and your rinse aid.  Sanitizer is also quite caustic, so the lines and dispensing units need to be changed more frequently.   For another, plates, glassware come out lukewarm from the machine, and don't dry as quickly as with high temps.  This leads to wet, messy counters and wet messy stacks of plates.   And...
Don't really feel it will matter much, the dough is fairly thin, and the surface area quite spread out, so it will defrost by the time you get your fillings in and in the oven. 
The devil is in the details...   Last time I looked at the specs, the Jackson had the highest water consumption and energy consumption of all three.  I personally am not thrilled with CMA, but this is my personal preference.   Hobart and Champion are solid machines, your choice will probably be based on price, warranty, and availability.
To be perfectly honest, I left the hot kitchen 9 years ago when I walked into the pastry kitchen.  That being said, I have a lot of contact with culinary students AND culinary instructors.   I have relationships with 3 culinary schools, and at least once a year all three send me at least one student for periods ranging from 2 weeks to 2 days.  By sheer coincidence, I've had no "deadbeats" in all these years, they've all showed up on time, ready for work, with no...
My quote button isn't working, but I ned to highlight your bit about: "I won't have anyone trimming out big$$$meat untill I show them how I want it done"... What I learned, was 1st year apprentices never really went near meat. Second years would maybe bone out chickens, remove the pin bones from salmon. Then cleaning tenderloins, by third year, the Chef would trust us enough to portion out chops, schnitzels, etc. Our final exam in the third year we were given a...
Nicko, Would it be possible to invite Mr. Blumenthal to comment on this thread? Perhaps we've taken his comment out of context, maybe we completely misunderstood it. In any case, no one ( so far) has been disresepectful towards Mr. Blumenthal, but we sure as heck are curious to understand what he really meant by it.
  You don't want top culinary instructors teaching you how to julienne 400 lbs of spuds, eh?  But your employers want that skill. You might not want to believe me, Iceman, but we are both on the same page--all your wants in your above post are exactly what I described in my previous post.  Repetition is for the work place, theory and knowledge is learned in the classroom.  I gave two examples in my previous post about how to achieve your wants, and they both work--very...
Question: How do you eat service? If its only service you want,try a car mechanic or a doctor.
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