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Posts by Omi

I will give this a try. I also add them to my mashed potatoes, they seem to cook faster than the potatoes so I add them a litttle bit after the potatoes. I also gave them to a local chef and he used them in ceviche.
Suzanne, What would be the difference in this and beignets? So, it is the baking powder that causes the "puff"? I am from New Orleans and it seems the biggest problem with beignets is that they don't puff (I hate those flat, thick, doughy things!). I have never made them from scratch, always used the French Market brand (and they seldom puff). I had always thought I might not be rolling them the correct thickness.
Check out the resources on restaurantowner.com. Something there may be of help. Do you use the book of yields for costing? Good luck.
My goodness! I am overwhelmed by the responses! Either my thermometer is way off or my oven is way off. The local kitchen store is temporarily out of oven thermometers so I will have to wait unless one from Wal-Mart will suffice. The thermometer I have measures my oven temp about 50 degrees off. I find that hard to believe so I will purchase another. (Although the leg of lamb I cooked the other night was very undercooked after I had cooked it for an hour--according to the...
I made the pâte à choux using the recipe in 'the Professional Chef' book (CIA). The recipe was 1 pint milk/water, 1 t sugar, 1 t salt, 8 oz butter, 12 oz. bread flour, 4-7 eggs (I used 6). When baked the cream puffs did not expand, the finished product was not light but a bit heavy and crispy, which will work out fine but what could I have done to make them turn out like they should? The baking instructions were 375 for a bit until they 'set' up then 350 to finish them...
Very exciting!! I admire him greatly! His passion for Mexican cuisine and his knowledge makes it an adventure to try his recipes. I have eaten at Frontera Grill in Chicago and there was not a morsel that was served that wasn't absolutely delicious. I have cooked nearly everything in the "Mexico, one plate at a time" cookbook! (several times) --it has been a good learning experience for me, in part because of his clear, concise direction. I absolutely love the way he...
My proposed restaurant kitchen is rather small (my main attraction will be the sushi bar). Under the hood, I have a 24"char-broiler, a 24" hot plate (gas burners), then a gas convection oven and my two deep fat fryers. I feel that the oven will make the use of the burners rather constricting. If I stay with gas, I have to keep it under the hood (that will be the only source of gas in the kitchen). I can use an electric in another spot (with a vent). I will use the oven...
Mike, I just last night learned of Penzey's! I will check them out right away, thanks for the reminder. I like intense flavor! Yes, I am guilty of in the past from depending heavy on the salt (for me, fleur du sel, the absolutely best from France--when I come back home my suitcase is packed with great salt, great soap, chocolate and sugar chunks). I have spent the last six years in transition, everything I thought to be true for 40 years has been altered and is evolving....
[/QUOTE]Of course, there is some seriously good cheese that is imported. Unfortunately some of the best never makes it here due to our laws about cheeses made with unpasteurized milk. Just a few of my favorites: Cabrales, Stilton (blue cheeses) sheep's milk cheese from the Pryennes, Explorateur (a very creamy soft ripened cheese), aged fontina, aged parmesan, reblochon, brin d'amour, and livarot, just to name a few. I am also a huge fan of long aged cheddars.[/quote] ...
Phil, I haven't had a look at the book but when you mentioned the term 'mâche' I thought you were talking about 'lambs lettuce' which is a delicious lettuce for salad often used in France or even maque choux which is a corn dish we often had growing up in Louisiana. Sure enough though, in my French dictionary, mâche is indeed a corn salad! Thanks for the little bit of info. Omi
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