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Posts by MikeLM

"...I almost always double the garlic!"   Isn't that the way everybody cooks?   Well, except for the "almost" part...   Mike
Well, proper Reuben or not, I am definitely going to try this. Please keep us informed of future research.   Are the bread & butter pickled onions different than regular pickled ones, such as I use in my Gibsons?   Mike
This thread shows the latest developments in Induction Cooking devices:   http://ovens.reviewed.com/features/the-future-of-induction-cooking-heats-up?utm_source=taboola&utm_medium=cpc   It's coming... it's coming!   Wish it had been available twelve years ago when I completely rebuilt my kitchen, where the condo allows no gas!   Mike
Cheflane--   What, no kraut and no Russian dressing??  Sounds like an OK Cuban-ish sandwich, but not  much of a Reuben. Even paired with a couple cold  bottles of The One-Eyed Indian, this really doesn't fulfill the complete Reuben specs.   Mike   But, wasn't that Cuban bread wonderful!   Alltogether now... shout HATUEY!   That will help set the ambiance, anyway.   M
OK, Cheflayne...   I've had Reubens (a favorite of mine) at many restaurants, Cubanos at many Cuban-style restaurants, and the Especial which wasn't Cuban-style but just plain Cuban, at Sloppy Joe's Bar and Restaurant in pre-Castro Havana. I copied it and it's been a family favorite ever since.   The Especial is a Dagwood-size production with many layers of cold cuts of five or six varities, interspersed with slices of different cheeses and mayo and mustard on wide...
'Squid...   Nice job, well narrated and illustrated.  Did that myself twelve years ago, and the kitchen is still going strong.  (Me, not quite so much.) My son owned a cabinet shop, so we did the cabinets, too.   A minor suggeston, which is a little late, but when you can, use ball valves for the water-supply stops. They mostly never wear out, which can't be said for the conventional angle valves.   Hope to see pix of the final product, and happy cooking!   Mike
Cerise- You mentioned "Philly meatball" things.   Philly cheesesteak I know, and it's exceptional, but could you describe Philly meatballs? I'm hoping these are just as remarkable.   Thanks,   Mike
Here's a great sandwich we copied from the Clam Digger, a funky restaurant in the Pike Place Market in Seattle in the late 1960's. It's been a family favorite ever since.   The Devil On Horseback sandwich:   Mix together chopped corned beef, shredded sharp cheddar cheese, finely diced seeded jalapenos, and chopped scalliions in about that descending order of quantity (we just copied ingredients off their menu, so you'll have to experiment) with enough Russian dressing...
Pollo'...   Check your pulse, man!  Your picture of the charcuterie counter makes me fear you have died and gone to heaven!   On another subject, assuming you're still alive- what variety of blue cheese do you picture in your later post? And, where can I get some, if it's an exotic variety?   Thanks,   Mike   I recently posted of my discovery of Wisconsin Bleu Affinee, a 6-month-aged buttermilk blue that is very reasonably priced and beautifully tangy.  Yours...
It was the Frugal Gourmet who introduced me to the trick oif straining any domestic yogurt through cheesecloth to achieve a Greek-like thick consistency.  I found that just lining the strainer with a single layer of a food-safe paper towel did just as well, avoiding the fuss, muss, and expense of cheesecloth. Been doing it that way for years.   He also said not to worry about finding room in the fridge- just leave the strainer and bowl on the counter overnight. I've...
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