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Posts by chefpeon

Trust me, you don't need to buy a product called "sticky bun sugar". These products are marketed for home bakers that don't know better. The above suggestions are good. 
I love Cook's Illustrated too. Here's the link to that back issue, if you want to read it: https://www.cooksillustrated.com/recipes/8575-baked-alaska
Since you've only been doing pastry a year and a half, I would be careful about biting off more than you can chew. Entremets usually consist of many components, each done in advance of the final construction of your dessert. You have to consider time involved, and also what kind of space you have in your kitchen freezer and refrigerator(s). If you do large volume, will you be able to keep up? Lots of things to consider besides just being able to do a fancy dessert. Even...
I totally get what you're saying and I agree. Perhaps I read the OP differently than you did. It was my impression that this person was hired on to do whatever it is he needed to do, but then brought up the topic of entremet to the exec after they were hired. Now that I re-read it, it's also possible to assume they made a promise to do something they had no idea about, which, yes, would be frustrating. Bottom line, is, we don't know.  I also agree that calling a cake with...
Hey, I'm not about to throw a bucket of water on OP's enthusiasm. Give up? Don't try? Heck no. I say go for it. We need a balance excitement and willingness in our fieldto offset the cynicism that occurs with chefs that have been doing it for so long. I'm one of them. You don't have to be trained by someone to do entremet, but it helps. It's totally do-able with self-education. The OP is reaching out for guidance on how to achieve a goal. I'm not going to tell them to turn...
I'm pretty sure there is no yeast involved here, assuming it's a short crust, and frangipane has no yeast in it. I think the OP said the bubble is forming underneath the crust between the pan and the bottom of the pastry, not in the frangipane itself, so I don't think overwhisking is the problem here either. I tend to agree with @flipflopgirl. Although I would be hesitant to dock the pastry before filling it with frangipane for fear the frangi might leak out the bottom....
@taku, the link you provided about why bread crusts crack, is a bit of an apples/oranges comparison to the cupcake cracking conundrum. Moisture in ovens does different things to different products and then there's also the question of how long the moisture is introduced. In the case of artisan breads, they are steamed immediately after being put into the oven for just about 15-30 seconds. Then the steam dissipates and the bread forms its hard crackly crust.    In the...
@taku, if you work in the food industry, you might want to consider changing your profile to reflect that. Your moniker just states "you just like food". This forum is for pros only and if you want to keep posting here, you should change your profile so you don't get flagged.
This is correct. If the OP really thinks the top crust cracking is a big deal, they can try putting a pan of water in the oven with the cupcakes and the resulting steam may keep the tops softenough long enough so they won't crack.  But personally, if the cupcakes are perfectly fine texturally and taste-wise, I wouldn't mess with a good thing. And I'm assuming they will be covered with icing later, so I don't see it as much of an issue at all.
If they are moist and great, why are you so worried about the cracking on the top? Aren't you just going to cover the top with icing anyway? Cracks don't necessarily mean anything is wrong, and I think they look kind of cool.    Also, this forum is for professionals only. This inquiry should be posted in the baking and pastry forum. 
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