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In the Kitchen with Carl and Betty Stone

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In the Kitchen with Carl and Betty Stone

FORWARD The recipes in this cookbook are written for the average cook, with easy to follow instructions that are simple to more complex for those special occasions. They are sure to be a food lovers delight. These recipes come to us from many different cultures that are a part of our heritage and have been handed down to Carl and myself through many generations. Other sources for this treasured collection of recipes are friends, cooking classes, and our own culinary creations. Also included, food history, lore, and quotes to make the overall food experience more meaningful and exciting for the reader. There is a strong Italian and Southwest predominance, As well as Cajun and other influences. We like our food robust, which is reflected in our recipes. "iN THE KITCHEN with Carl and Betty Stone" is a cookbook that will definitely not set on the shelf. But a favorite that will be well worn from constant use. "Food with flavor, not boring. In conclusion, Carl and I enjoy learning from cultures of past and present culinary artists, as well as attending cooking classes whenever we find one that strikes our fancy, and time permits. Betty Stone INTRODUCTION With me, food has always been a big deal. Right from my earliest memories, I was a trencherman, and why not? My family was blessed with great cooks, which to this day has made me demand the best food that I could get. Our family lived in an Italian neighborhood when I was a kid, and there if you couldn’t cook, I think they deported you or something. You could walk into Harry Risso’s house and find salamis hanging out to cure. Or over to Louie and Dolly Tassano’s home and they were making wine in the basement. On Christmas Eve my dad would make ravioli and invite everyone in the family. They would trickle by from late afternoon to late night, with a new batch being prepared as they came through the door. So, there was a strong Italian influence from my youth, and Italian food continues to be important as I age. My paternal grandmother was an absolute genius in the kitchen, and as a youngster I apprenticed in her kitchen, as well as at home. She could walk into the kitchen, and in no time at all produce a mouth-watering meal. As a young girl on a ranch, she had to cook for the ranch hands, and they didn’t put up with bad food. My Grandma had five sisters, and they were all great cooks, but all gave her a wide berth when it came to the best food. My wife Betty has that same affinity for the art of food, and I know of no better cook. That says a lot, as I’ve dined in some mighty fine places in my time. Since we’ve lived in Arizona, Southwest cuisine has become a steady part of our diet. Heavily influenced by Mexican cooking, the Southwest has added some new twists. We met and became close friends with a man from Louisiana, a genuine Cajun. We ate many a fine meal at each other’s homes, and the hot and spicy food flowed heavily. Our good friend has since passed on, but his memory, and some of his Cajun influence is still alive and well here at our home. Betty use to make Gumbo for an annual New Years Eve bash at our digs. The last one we had, was the last one that our good friend PJ was around for. Probably one of the finest compliments that Betty ever got was when P.J. told her that her gumbo was the best he ever ate, no small accomplishment! No food is at it’s best without seasoning. With that in mind, the choices are limitless. Certainly some spice is required in nearly anything that one would create, and in some cases that can get heavy. When it comes to seasonings, neither Betty nor myself ever met a dish that was too hot for us when it comes to judging spiciness as it relates to heat. We both attended cooking classes at an upscale restaurant, here in Arizona. Chef Franklin Biggs, who at the time was the chef at West Court in the Buttes, gave these classes. Biggs was from Northern California, like me. In addition, Biggs’s attended the famed Cordon Bleu Cooking School in Paris where he mastered many of the culinary skills that lend to his fame in the kitchen. Biggs’s stories about the time he spent at the cooking school were every bit as enjoyable as his extensive knowledge about the kitchen. Also, these stories added to the enjoyment of a particular dish, when there was a connection between the story and the food being prepared and eaten. So, we are a blend of many cultures in our kitchen, taking what we consider the best from each, and using the finest and freshest ingredients. Carl Stone

AuthorBetty Stone
Label1 on 1 Consulting
List Price$16.95
Manufacturer1 on 1 Consulting
Number Of Pages240
Product GroupBook
Product Type NameABIS_BOOK
Publication Date2002-08-06
Publisher1 on 1 Consulting
Studio1 on 1 Consulting
TitleIn the Kitchen with Carl and Betty Stone
Model Name/TypeMPNEAN/UPC
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