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Cleaning All-Clad Stainless Steel

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
Hi...I just bought my first few pieces of All-Clad stainless, and after using my fry pan once (for browning chicken and sauteeing veggies), I was left with nasty brown spotty stains. I've tried in vain to remove them, and I know steel wool is a big no-no on All-Clad. So what can I do?

Thanks!
post #2 of 26
There's a product called Barkeeper's Friend that's supposed to work really well.

But you know what? AC can take a light scrub with steel wool if that's what it needs. Think about it: if it can stand relatively high heat and lots of use without warping or coming apart, a little abrasion to the surface is not going to harm it drastically.

We've had lots of discussions here of the care and feeding of AllClad; you might want to do a search using "All Clad" and AllClad" and you'll find lots of advice and experience. That's what we're here for -- to share! :D
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #3 of 26
Little Gem:

Virtually all my cookware is All Clad and I just go ahead and use brillo on the inside.

I sauteed a thick steak in my all clad skillet that I finished in the oven. Good Lord, you should have seen the spots when I took it out. I had no choice but to use steel wool.

I guess one alternative would be to soak it overnight and then use one of those sponges with the abrasive side. But I'm sure that will take much more elbow grease than the brillo.

I have heard you're not supposed to use steel wool on All Clad. I can see it might scratch the outside but what's the problem with using it on the inside????

Mark
Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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post #4 of 26
Thread Starter 

Thank you!

Excellent. Thank you for your replies!
post #5 of 26
I bought a tub of Barkeepers Friend at the weekend, specfically to use on my All Clad. It was the burned on black stuff on the outside I was most concerned with (purely aesthetic.)
I always figured it was the mirror like finish on the inside that gave AC its easy clean up quality and any scouring agent would reduce that ability.
I didn't use it yet so I don't know how well it works. Ill report back in a few days when I have tried it.

Jock
post #6 of 26
Barkeepers Friend is WONDERFUL! Never used it on the inside of a pan, but it makes the outside shiny and clean without scratching. Does wonders for porcelain sinks too!
post #7 of 26
The following is from the All-Clad Website: http://www.allclad.com/
post #8 of 26
Thread Starter 
Well, I guess I'll be getting myself a tub of Barkeeper's Friend!

Thanks :bounce:
post #9 of 26
In my experience, an SOS pad works fine for this on occassion - I just make sure to get it really wet, and use only the minimum necessary pressure.

Too much praise for BF - I've gotta get some of this!
post #10 of 26
I put my All Clad stainless in the dishwasher and for the most part it cleans up great. If anything is left Barkeeper's Friend is a must. Works like a charm. Deb
post #11 of 26

Steel Wool

Steel Wool Just another note on the steel wool, take a look at the fifth one
from the All-Clad site.
Another poster also had a good point. Anything that will scratch the surface
of the cooking surface will cause food to stick.
Larry Sharrott
Owner
Superior Chef, LLC
www.superiorchef.com
"Quality products for the Superior Chef"
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Larry Sharrott
Owner
Superior Chef, LLC
www.superiorchef.com
"Quality products for the Superior Chef"
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post #12 of 26
We have a number of pieces of cookware called Magnalite Professional Stainless- made just like All Clad, but with copper in the middle of the stainless sandwich instead of aluminium.

Great stuff- but they quit making it several years ago.

Their instructions for removing the baked-on varnish that discolors the pan when the heat has been too high is to put a tablespoon of dishwasher detergent in about 1/4 inch of water in the pan and let it simmer - not too hot - for a few minutes.

TURN ON YOUR EXHAUST BLOWER- boiling dishwasher detergent is not the most fragrant thing you can have in your house!

It has worked for me every time I have gotten carried away with too much heat. You don't have to use heavy abrasives.

No reason it won't work with All Clad or any other stainless pots.

Mike
travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #13 of 26
Say, where do you get Barkeeper's Friend?
post #14 of 26
It's in some grocery stores where they keep the kitchen cleanser (Comet-type stuff) and also in hardware stores.
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
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Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
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post #15 of 26
Brook,

Check in your phone book under the yellow pages if you're in the states for Restaurant Supply places. They are usually open to the public and can be an excellent for resource for cost effective, quality kitchen equipment, especially for those in smaller towns.
post #16 of 26
GIVE IT TO THE POTWASH !
champagne for my bad friends
& bad pain for my cham friends
(Francis Bacon)
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champagne for my bad friends
& bad pain for my cham friends
(Francis Bacon)
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post #17 of 26
I found Barkeeper's Friend at Wal-mart! It could scarcely be more convenient!
post #18 of 26

Stainless Steel

Hey All! I just found this site, and I'm surprised at all the glowing reviews of Bar Keeper's Friend. I bought some in liquid form and haven't found it to be effective. Any thoughts? Are you all using the powder stuff?

:chef:
post #19 of 26

Has anyone....

Has anyone used NEVER DULL to clean their all-clad?
nevrdull.com
aj
post #20 of 26
I've never used it on cookware, but I have used Nevr-Dull extensively on other things. I would advise against using it on cookware: it is quite abrasive, albeit fairly fine-grit. What's more, the solvent is both amazingly flammable and designed to leave a very slight film on the polished surface (making polishing necessary less often). I would be concerned that you would scratch your cookware and then light it on fire, which doesn't seem desirable.

Could be sort of fun, though, in a weird way. :bounce:
post #21 of 26

never-a-dull moment

Thanks for the warning...
I'm jeanne-andrea is my chef.
Too late, I did use the neverdull. It worked pretty good. Afterward, I did wash averything in hot soapy water and dried it with a soft cloth. There dosen't seem to be a film but I will warn her.
This is why I don't c:crazy::crazy:k!
post #22 of 26
I realize this is an old post, but it deserves a response. BarKeeper's Friend liquid is a waste of money. However, the powder is everything everyone has said it is, and inexpensive too.
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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post #23 of 26
Another vote here for BarKeeper'sFriend. :)
post #24 of 26
You must use Barkeeper's Friend POWDER (not the liquid or spray versions). The powder worked like a dream at removing the baked on, high heat "varnish" I had on my brand new d5 saute pans. I didn't think I'd ever get them clean after I got a bit carried away with the heat. I'd tried using the liquid but it didn't even touch the stuff. The powder took it off immediately. Barkeeper's Friend is really inexpensive and you can usually find it in the aisle with the scouring powders. Gold can with blue label. Thanks to all!
post #25 of 26

I have had a hard time cleaning the outside of my all clad pots. Used and loved for many many years.

Inside I use a half cup baking soda, water. Bring to a boil, cover and let sit at least an hour but  all day is better if you have that option.

Voila.. clean and ready to use again

post #26 of 26

This is Straight from the All-Clad FAQ section of their website...you can use Bar Keeper's Friend inside the pan:

 

• For daily cleaning, warm, soapy water is sufficient. Clean your All-Clad thoroughly after each use. Food films left on the pan may cause discoloration and sticking.

 
• To get rid of stuck-on food or discolouration, and stains from using too high a heat, we recommend cleaning your All-Clad with a specialist stainless steel cleaning product called ‘Bar Keeper's Friend’.
 
• To use the Bar Keeper's Friend, simply use a soft cloth or sponge and water and make into a soupy paste. This can be used on the interior, as well as the exterior of your All-Clad.
 
• If your water has high iron content, you may notice a rusty discolouration. Use ‘Bar Keeper's Friend’ to remove this. Please also refer to the Use & Care section of this page.​

 

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