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Braised Chicken Problem

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Hello. Please help! I recently tried a recipe for braised chicken, which was taken from a popular TV show. I followed all of the steps precisely, but had trouble after I added the broth. I browned four chicken breasts, seasoned with salt and pepper, for 3-4 minutes on each side in 1 T. olive oil. I removed them, added 1 T. oil, 1 lb. sliced mushrooms, garlic cloves and salt; covered and sauted them. I then added the 1/2 cup wine and let evaporate for one minute. Next, I added 1 3/4 cups chicken broth and 2 T. parsley, cooked on medium-high, and waited patiently for the eight minutes for the broth to start to evaporate/thicken, but it didn't. I then returned the chicken to the broth/mushroom mixture and, still following the recipe, I covered the pan and let the combination simmer for 14-16 minutes, but the broth never evaporated or thickened.

What could the problem? I followed the recipe as shown on TV, and as directed on the copy of the recipe from the website. Could it be the brand of broth?



:confused:
post #2 of 6
These recipes are often flawed so don't beat yourself up about it. When tested (I should say IF tested) recipe writers often use much hotter professional stovetops which allow liquids to evaporate faster.

First, if mushrooms are sauteed then covered, one minute of evaporation will not make any difference to the liquid that has come out of the mushroom, which can be significant. I always saute uncovered until dry. Try not to follow the recipe as much as your own instinct and just go with what your desired result is and do what makes sense. If a braising liquid is too watery, remove your meat, place the pan on a hot stove and reduce until it looks and tastes good to you.

It's YOUR kitchen, and YOUR dish. Have fun with it!:D

PS: Canned broth doesn't really thicken when you reduce it. You need good old fashioned homemade stock made from bones to get all the gelatin out.
post #3 of 6
I agree with Anneke,

Next time dredge your breast in seasoned flour,this will help develope a "Fond" and also help to thicken your reduction.

Happy cooking.
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #4 of 6
I agree with all the above points.
Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thanks, Everyone

I want to thank everyone for their advice. Maybe I'll give that recipe a second chance, and, of course, implement all of your suggestions!

I am planning on making some homemade chicken soup, and I can save some of that broth!
post #6 of 6
I agree also, a good flour dusting after seasoning will always give you a nice bind for sauce. Also keeps the chicken juicy!!

:chef:
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