or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Clam Showder

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
When I go to Golden Corral with my family I always eat like 3 bowls of clam showder because I love how they make it.... I dont know if it's canned or something but I would like to know the recipe.....help???

Gear mentioned in this thread:

post #2 of 20
There are two basic types of clam chowder: New England (white, creamy) and Manhattan (tomatoey). Actually, there is a third kind, Rhode Island, but that is nowhere near as common as the other two. So I ask you: Is the chowder you love so much white and creamy, or kind of tomatoey? If we know that, we can give you zillions of recipes.

(As for me, I never met a chowder I didn't like, unless it had too much flour to thicken it, or was made from flavorless ingredients. My favorite is: whichever one I happen to be eating at the moment. :D )
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
post #3 of 20
Thread Starter 
Oh, ok yes, I love white and creamy clam showder because it's the only one I know...lol! thank you!
post #4 of 20
Mmmmm, Chowder!!!

It’s really quite simple you know.

First, you drive up to the Cape, buy your claming permit and head to Eastham’s “Great Salt Pond” (be sure to have on old sneakers)

Now you dig for cherry stones and quahogs. After that, you head to your cottage, wash, and scrub the clam very, very well under cold running water.

Then in a large stockpot place some thinly sliced onions, a couple pieces of fresh thyme, a bit of white wine a bay leaf or two and some water (not much though, your looking to steam, not boil the clams)

Gently place your incredible clean clam in the pot, cover and fire it up. Let them steam until the little guys open up then kill the heat.

Carefully remove the clams and let them cool, Strain your now wonderful clam broth through a fine sieve lined with cheesecloth and reserve.

So, at this time you of course have lots of diced celery and onion, as well as lardoons of bacon. In a pot, slowly render your bacon (pancetta and fat back will work also) when your bacon is three 1/4s cooked add the vegetables and a bouquet garni and sauté until the veggies are tender.

Add a bit of flour to this to develop a roux (not to much, just enough to help marry everything) cook this out for a few minutes and add a bit of white wine from Truro and reduce by half, then add your broth (you may need some water as well) please no salt at this time because your base may be salty already.

So now peel some white spuds and dice, then pull your mollusks and dice as well. Bring a spot of cream to a simmer (or milk, or ½ & ½ but I like cream)

Be sure to stir your developing soup as your have a bottom roux that will scorch if left alone.

Ok, add your spuds and cook until tender, then your clams, then and your cream.

Add a nice shot of fresh thyme and dill (I like it this way) check and adjust your seasoning, remove your bouquet garni and you should be ready to enjoy
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
Reply
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
Reply
post #5 of 20
cape chef , what a description of your recipe! Your love of cooking and knowledge of how to do it good just shines through with this one my friend . Lets eat my friends , Doug...........................
The two most common things in the universe are hydrogen and stupidity !
Reply
The two most common things in the universe are hydrogen and stupidity !
Reply
post #6 of 20
Only the master, Cape Chef can say... "It's simple..." followed by...

"First, you drive up to the Cape, buy your claming permit and head to Eastham’s “Great Salt Pond” (be sure to have on old sneakers)

Now you dig for cherry stones and quahogs. After that, you head to your cottage, wash, and scrub the clam very, very well under cold running water."


Great recipe... and commentary!

Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

My Author Page

Reply

Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

My Author Page

Reply
post #7 of 20
Clam chowder... one of my all time favourite soups.

My recipe is not too different from Cape Chef's. 'course I don't get to the cape much to pick clams so I use Gorton's canned clams. Ok, OK, OK. I know you afficionados are cringing right now but it's convenient OK?
Anyway, I prepare a mirepoix (did I spell that right?) and proceed much as Cape Chef describes. I've never used the wine before, interesting idea. I use 2% milk instead of cream because I like the lighter soup. I sometimes use salt pork instead of bacon. It works pretty well. (Actually, it depends on what I have in the 'fridge at the time :) )

Julia Child uses crushed crackers to thicken the soup instead of flour. I don't care for it too much. The taste of the cracker is too pronounced by the time you add enough to do the job.

Jock
post #8 of 20
Brad,
Very romantic and poetic sounding. That's why I always wanted to live up there. You lucky fella you. That's how a cookbook should be written!
My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
Reply
My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
Reply
post #9 of 20

Mmmmmm!

Cape Chef, from your description I had a picture of magic swirling in the pot, savory aromas drifting through the kitchen, and grateful smiles on the faces of your family as you all enjoy this. :lips:

This is one of my favorite meals. Since I can't use flour for a liaison, or potato to help thicken it, I stir in a little arrowroot to give the chowder (soup, really) some body. The rest is "kosher" for a low carber! :p
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
post #10 of 20
All I can say is YUM. Sounds delish, beginning to end.:lips:
post #11 of 20
Can those clams be replaced by other mollusks? Frozen green shell mussels from New Sealand or just the "normal" black mussels (mylius edilis) from the North Sea?

Clams are very hard to come by here in Germany.

Armand
post #12 of 20
Hi Armand,

The mussels will really change the whole dimension of the soup,mostly because of the broth they release.More lactiad in flavor.

You can however make "Billi Bi" soup, or other mussels based soups.

I make a mussels cream soup that I put a little curry in the roux,it adds an exoctic color and flavor.
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
Reply
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
Reply
post #13 of 20
Thread Starter 
can I add some potato to the showder or will this ruin the soup?
post #14 of 20
Potato would be great. Many chowder recipes include potatoes. Just be sure to choose the right potato.
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
post #15 of 20
cape chef , if there was ever an award for giving the most heart felt recipe to others , while we are able to taste it through your words , well cape chef , you deserve it . You should really consider a book my friend ! I would buy it ! Keep cookin , Doug.....................
The two most common things in the universe are hydrogen and stupidity !
Reply
The two most common things in the universe are hydrogen and stupidity !
Reply
post #16 of 20
Thank you Chefboy,

You have a big heart.

Happy cooking my friend.
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
Reply
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
Reply
post #17 of 20
Living in the land locked west, I too must resort to canned clams. I can find 24 hour old clams flown in, but the price is prohibitive beyond special occasions. And they're not spanking fresh. And clam chowder is too good for just special occasions.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #18 of 20
Another question from someone living on the other side of the ocean!

CC, could clams be replaced with our Vongole? I suppose they're smaller, and undoubtedly they lack that magic flavour I can smell in your post:) , but do you think that they could be more suitable for chowder than mussels?

Pongi
post #19 of 20
Hi Pongi,

Yes you can use your Vongole's.

What you should do is pre steam them like cherry stones to develope your broth,then cool them down quickly.Pick them and procceed as above.

I love them with garlic,pepper flakes,parlsy and olive oil and toss them with some pasta :)
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
Reply
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
Reply
post #20 of 20
Thanks Brad!

I love Vongole just the same way...especially with Linguine or Bucatini:lips:

Pongi
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking

Gear mentioned in this thread: