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Packaging methods for extending shelf life?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
For individually packaging muffins and cookies, what would you use? I was thinking of shrink wrapping, but I usually see them packaged in stores or coffee shops in a crisper plastic with breathing room and the ends are heat sealed. Which would last longer or is it a matter of preference? Any benefits of one over the other?
post #2 of 10
The less air there is in the package, the longer the shelf life. The mass-produced brands have enough preservatives in them to last a week with no wrapper at all!!:eek:
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
That's what I was thinking, but I had also seen two organic brands of donuts that had space. *shrugs* Tight shrink wrapping it is.

Thanks! :)
post #4 of 10
Not sure about muffins, but for cookies I use tin tie bags. They seem to keep for uo to two weeks (shortbrtead and other high fat cookies). WHat kind of shelf life are you looking for?
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
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"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
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post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 
Kyle, this is the thing: I'm not sure. I will start supplying a cafe with desserts by the end of the month/early next month. The owner did ask what is freezer stable and what isn't so that tells me she has freezer space and can thaw muffins and cookies and she needs them so things freshness shouldn't be a problem. Not like she's gonna leave it out until it all sells.
post #6 of 10
Is the venue where you'll be selling your products odor-free? One thing I've noticed about baked goods (especially breads) is that they absorb odors very easily. If there's any chance that your products will be in an odorous environment (coffee, smoke, perfume, cleaning products, fish, cooking odors) I would recommend heavy duty packaging. Plastic is both air and odor permeable. If you have to use plastic, the thicker the better. Double bagging might help.

Also, if you know your goods will be frozen, thicker plastic/less air in the bag will be a preventative for freezer burn.

And lastly, make sure the plastic itself doesn't have a smell that will taint the food. Although I'm more sensitive than most people, I can detect the off flavor in zip lock bag stored food.
post #7 of 10
If a freezer is used to be used for production it is a great tool. If you use a freezer for storage the effect can be different.
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 
Scott, I'm not sure yet how smelly the cafe will be. It's not even opened yet.

Panini, I am pretty anti-freezer for storage so I don't sell more than they can sell in a relatively short time. For example, I can't sell less than 20 brownies (one pan) of 1 flavor at a time, but for example, if she can sell 10 of each per week, I don't think freezing the rest for a week is bad. If someone wanted to buy 3 months' worth and freeze it, I would say no way. Shouldn't be a problem though b/c my minimum for free deliver is low enough so she won't have to stock up like that.

Also... I've been trying to figure out a fair price to tack on for shrink wrapping. Can't come up with a number. The suggestions I've got so far is between 10 - 20 cents per item. I think that barely covers the cost of the shrink wrap!
post #9 of 10

this may be not so great but at least it is fresh and no "cold storing"

 

but in the coffee shops in nyc i always see the muffins tightly wrapped in plastic and then held in a cake stand.  maybe offer or suggest a cake stand so they are at room temp and aesthetically pleasing to eye.  also, "easily accessible"

post #10 of 10

anyone have any ideas for "organic" or natural preservatives for sandies?  i have to make some as gift bag items for a wedding and want to do ahead.  are preservatives even needed.  they are high fat.

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