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substitute for pectin?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Hi, I want to make a jam and all the recipes i find online call for the ingredient called pectin. i have no access to pectin here - i'm from asia, so my question is, can i substitute this ingredient with something else like cornstarch or gelatin perhaps? and if i can, how would i work out the proportions...? I want to make a jam that's not based on a fruit, like mint jam or coffee jam, so the binding ingredient is really necessary... Please help.
post #2 of 6
There is no substitute. You really can't get pectin? Try cooking the jelly with cubed green apples. I'd start with one green apple per liter. Then strain out the apples and set.
post #3 of 6

I saw in some of your discussions that you were using coffee rich for your kosher pastry cream. I make kosher pastry cream all the time. STOP using coffee rich and start using soy milk. Soy milk causes the cream to thicken. Some soy milks are thicker than others as well. My pastry cream comes out very thick. After it is set I beat it in a mixer to smooth it out and it is outstanding.

I also use the fish geletain for my mousses. I get it from Israel, however there is a company certified under the orthodox union that makes a kosher bovine geletain as well. It is made by a company in New York. If you want the name I can look it up although I like the fish geletain  better so that is what I use

post #4 of 6

Pectin is naturally found in fruit and in some fruit the levels are high enough its not needed as an additive.  Some stores sell pectin mixed with sugar called gelling sugar or jam sugar.  There is an enzyme bottled as Novoshape that strengthens existing pectin bonds which could allow you to get away with just the amounts present in whatever fruit.  I doubt its easier to find than pectin though.

 

The easiest way by far is to just make your own. Orange peels are loaded with pectin.  30% by mass.  If you were to boil orange peels in a water/acid mixture and reduce a while the liquid you'd be left with could be used in your recipes although its tough to say how much to use.  You'll just have to experiment.

 

My guess at a recipe:

 

2 large orange peels

juice from one lemon

2 c water

 

Technique: Combine all ingredients and bring to a boil.  Reduce mixture by half (about 20 mintuesish).  Remove peels.  Reduce juice by half once again.  Store under refrigeration.

post #5 of 6

I make jam all the time and I NEVER USE PECTIN.  It's counterintuitive, but you have to have green fruit, that is fruit that is not ripe yet, under-ripe, to make jam.  If they are cherries, they should not be ripe, but hard and slightly sour.  If you use plums, make sure they're very firm and not ripe.  Same for all the others. 

Many people think that jam should be made with super-ripe fruit, but no - the natural pectin of the fruit goes away as the fruit ripens. 

Then use about 3 parts sugar to 4 parts fruit. 

Adding some lemon juice makes the jam harden better.

You can always boil up some apple cores too, and use that water well reduced in your jam. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #6 of 6

Name of the k-gelatin  is KO-JEL.It is OU certified. As is Victor/Victor brand. For many things guava gum will work, carageenan, some mod food starches will also thicken. Sysco handles a product which will jell anything without cooking. Just whip it in. There is a product called Certo that is pur Pectin

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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