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spoiled meat recipes?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
i was wondering if anyone know of any recipes for spoiled meat (i.e., to prepare a meat gone rancid for consumption)? i have heard of such a thing, but thus far have been fruitless in my search for any.

to be honest, my interest lies more in the domain of history rather than culinary arts but i thought this would be an excellent place to throw out my query.

anyone with any serious information can email me at worker11811@hotmail.com .

thank you very much!

dave
post #2 of 22
Ok, you have piqued my interest.

What and why are you seeking rancid meat recipes?

As history goes, preserving meats was the interest of most, although there must be something out there in regards to rancid meats, perhapes HACCPs web page can help :D
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post #3 of 22
You would want to read on the Inuit people and Eskimo culture as they practice the consumpution of rancid meat.
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Thanks,

Nicko 
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post #4 of 22
Hi vinacava.

I will see what I can do for this I have a book in mind. In the mean time I am asking any of our members that have info to post it here apart from e-mailing vinacava, I am sure that everybody wants to learn. :)
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"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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post #5 of 22
Thread Starter 

wow

i'm glad to see some response to this! to answer cape chef's query, yes, meat preservation has always been a foremost concern throughout man's culinary history. however, there were many opportunities in our earlier times for meat to go bad and no other option to get fresher replacements. specifically, in times of famine and drought.

where i first heard about the possibility for a recipe to exist was in the context of homesteading in the american west. oftentimes, these families were left with only what was in the pantry, or rather, the root cellar; while they had to wait to go to town, which was usually 2-3 days ride for these folks. although it's more likely that they would just go without meat for a few days, there is the remote possibility that some developed a way to essentially "re-cure" their meat once it had spoiled.

enough for now, but it is quite fascinating. thanks again for all your help!

d

oh, and about the eskimo peoples, i believe that may be more myth than fact. although they are the only known culture to have a completely meat diet, eskimos generally cured their meats immediately upon acquiring it. the myth may stem from foreigners unused to their curing methods, which i've tasted for myself and do have a stronger, more bitter flavour.
post #6 of 22
To respond to Nikos post well yes , the Inuit or Eskimos do have a practice of eating rancid meat ! Some people swear to the health benefits of eating this meat as it is a festoon of spoilage bacteria and they feel this helps them ! Who knows ? All I know is that when you are sick and dying most people will try anything to stay alive . Ill pass on the practice myself ! But it is true if you have been in the biz long enough . As Bourdaine said in his book watch out for fish on mondays , and specials !
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post #7 of 22
There are many cultures that use "controlled spoilage" as part of curing. My grandfather talks of curing hams, then burying them, digging them up months later, cutting off the outside and having beautifully cured ham. I believe that other cultures have similar recipes.
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http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
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post #8 of 22
Remember the maggoty cheese? :eek:
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post #9 of 22

I sure do

I remember reading about the maggoty cheese, Mezz. Gross! I also remember reading a newspaper article a few years back that stated that if people ate raw or spoiled meat from infancy, it would never make them sick in adulthood. I won't have any, thank you:) But it did make me wonder about dogs. Animals eat spoiled meat all the time and don't get sick. A dog has a lot in common with humans as far as digestion and health needs are concerned. They even take a lot of the same medications.
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post #10 of 22
The northern Thai make sausages out of rice and pork and then ferment them... actually come to think of it.. shrimp paste and fish sauce are both fermented products.
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post #11 of 22

Cooking with rancid meats

:chef: While we no longer used spoiled food in most modern cooking, many classic reciepes evolved out of the practice of the chef/cooks trying to use up spoiled foods. American Chili for example--the cooks of the wagon trains heading west would use up rancid beef by adding spices (to hide the rancid taste & smell) and beens to made the chili. Creamed Chipped Beef has a simialar origin. :eek:
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Chef Al The Independent Chefs Federation: www.geocities.com/chefsfederation
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post #12 of 22
My grandmother was Scottish... being from a poor family and in the depression... often the cheapest meat to get was the toughest/chewiest cut and she often cooked rancid meat... particulary beef and chicken... I can remember seeing it hanging in the larder... waiting for it to turn a pretty greenish colour... and then it being used for stews and soups, watching her wash and clean it and toss it in the pot...

AussieKris
post #13 of 22
Guys you beat me to the rancid whale meat.....but also there was garum which was the base of a lot of Roman cooking...this is fermented fish guts n stuff & acted as an all in one spice,not unlike the nampla of oriental cooking today.
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champagne for my bad friends
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post #14 of 22
I just have to throw something in here- before anyone gets any ideas. Once meat has spoiled, there is no way to "cook out" the bacteria. Spoiled meat generally contains staphylococcus which is in fact killed when meat is cooked above 165 degrees, however, a spore forms around the bacteria which is toxic and heat stable.

I had to add that because I remember as a kid working in kitchens where the cooks would tell you if you cooked spoiled meat that it killed the bacteria. These were the same guys who rinsed off spoiled fish with vinegar.
Michael
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post #15 of 22

From 1929 to 1939 the great depression lasted. I am not instructing you to eat anything, just an attempt to answer to your question Some people lived better than others during this 10 year period. Just as we now do. Our society has always had class, my mother once had some meat that had spoiled and just as I was about to throw it in the garbage, she asked "what are you doing"? She was born in 1938 and just because the GD was said to last 10 years don't believe people started drinking champagne the next year.! She said let me show you something: she then took the meat and salted it well then covered it with water and allowed it to sit. Afterwards she rinsed it well and cooked it! you couldn't tell if it had been overdue for the can or not...Just how bad it was I don't know? but I recalled  her doing this. some of the people in these forums have never seen a difficult day in their lives. If things continue at their present course we all just might need some salt...Not an instruction just answering your question..

post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by UniChef View Post

I just have to throw something in here- before anyone gets any ideas. Once meat has spoiled, there is no way to "cook out" the bacteria. Spoiled meat generally contains staphylococcus which is in fact killed when meat is cooked above 165 degrees, however, a spore forms around the bacteria which is toxic and heat stable.

Yes, i was wondering the same thing - i knew this as well.  Nevertheless there are plenty of periods in history when people ate meat that we would consider inedible and dangerous. 

My inlaws were married in Italy during the war - there was little food, and they went on their honeymoon to Venice.  My mother-in-law's mother gave them a (raw) chicken to take with them in case the restaurants had no food, and she could give it to them to cook.  So they took it on the train, stayed a couple of days in hotels, and then took the chicken, which wasn;t refrigerated and had begun to smell, to the restaurant and they cooked it up for them.  Their only fear was that they may have kept the chicken for themselves and served them cat!

Also as a kid i remember the roast on sunday, chicken or beef, was kept in the unlit oven until supper when it was eaten, and my inlaws did this till they died.  So i guess that the danger is great, but probably more rare than we think. 

Washing the outside of meat before cooking was done a lot in my inlaw's family - the external blood would sometimes have an off smell, and it was a shame to throw it out - that's also because they had experienced both the depression and the war and couldn't bear to waste anything. 

 

Many people are talking about fermented meat, which is certainly different from staph infected meat.  Maybe some fermenting agents are protective against dangerous bacteria? 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pastachef View Post

I remember reading about the maggoty cheese, Mezz. Gross! I also remember reading a newspaper article a few years back that stated that if people ate raw or spoiled meat from infancy, it would never make them sick in adulthood. I won't have any, thank you:) But it did make me wonder about dogs. Animals eat spoiled meat all the time and don't get sick. A dog has a lot in common with humans as far as digestion and health needs are concerned. They even take a lot of the same medications.

We were on a trip with a friend and his dog, and he would buy the dog meat and leave it in the trunk for a couple of days because if it was fresh,. he said, it would be hard for him to digest. 

 

One thing i did read was that if you grew up with a certain diet that was the natural diet of your area (aboriginal diets of various parts of the world, including insects, larvae, meat only, or vegetable only or whatever it was) and you moved to a place with a more modern and varied industrial-society diet like ours, you would be much more subject to all the modern ills - high blood pressure, heart attacks, cholesterol, etc.  But bringing them back to their original diet brought back their health, no matter how restricted and unhealthy that diet seems to us (e.g. all meat).  I guess those who couldn't tolerate that diet all died off, and those who flourished in these restricted diets survived. And at the same time, your body develops the enzymes to handle the foods it's used to receiving.  (Some people can't digest milk if they stop having it for too long, but if they start having it and keep it up, they eventually re-develop the necessary enzymes.  Or so i read).

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #17 of 22
I have had some experience working with meat that is starting to spoil. In the Philippines they have a dish called Adobo. I have used Meat that I would never think of buying in Canada. I was eating dishes there that we would normally throw out here. The smell and the colour of the chicken that was starting to go rancid was horrid
 
But the surprising thing was once the meat was washed to remove the blood and then prepared with a lot of course sea salt. well after the wash and the salting some of the smell from that rancid chicken meat was gone. Well after the chicken was salted they then put in a White Vinegar, Dill Pickle, Soy Sauce and Rice Vinegar Brine it was left to marinate for 2-4 hours.
 
And worse yet they left it to marinate on a counter not in a fridge or a icebox. This was a dish I would never have thought to eat let alone think of how blessedly delicious it was. Well after marinating for a time on a counter in hot humid weather they took the cut up chicken pieces removed the bones and put the meat in a pot the poured some of the marinade on top of the chicken in the pot then proceeded to add assorted spices, they simmered the chicken meat in that marinade until it was reduced to a very thick gravy like consistency. 
 
They served the Chicken adobo on top of steamed rice. And let me tell you it was fantastic. I often go to my local butcher to buy beef chicken or pork that is just starting to spoil and I prepare meat the same way as I learned from the Filipino family I was staying with I have grown to love Filipino Adobo Dishes.
 
And don't even get me started on the Dinuguan or Pork Blood Stew which is also delicious.
 
Here is a simple Chicken Adobo recipe that can serve 6-8 people
 
Ingredient list
4-5 lbs. chicken thighs or Thighs and Legs
1/2 cup white vinegar
1/2 cup soy sauce
4 cloves garlic, crushed
1 tsp. black peppercorns
3 bay leaves
 
Directions
Combine all ingredients in a large pot. Cover and marinate chicken for 1-3 hours. Bring to boil, then lower heat. Cover and let simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Uncover and simmer until sauce is reduced and thickened, and chicken is tender, about 20 more minutes. Serve with steamed rice.
 
If you are looking for more ways to prepare spoiled or spoiling meats talk with some Thai and Filipino cooks they can tell you some of the better ways on how to cook meat that most of us westerners would never touch. By the way I finished having Chicken Adobo for dinner an hour ago and have not yet gotten sick eating the dish. And buying meat that is going rancid is 1/2 to 3/4 the cost of fresh cut meats
Signed
Mataba Palaka < Translated to English it means Fat Frog.  
post #18 of 22

I heard about people eating rancid meat in Scandinavia.

 

http://goscandinavia.about.com/od/annualeventstraditions/qt/thorrablot.htm

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post #19 of 22

Here are some photos of Chicken Adobo.

 

 

 

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post #20 of 22

This will be vague.....

A decade or so back I was watching one of the travel shows on PBS.

One of the things he always did on his segments was eat weird (to us) local food.

He took viewers to a shed of some sort that was used to hang and umm age (rot) the local fish/shark.

The local guy cut a hunk off and of course the guide gagged and made some faces but he somehow got it down.

Then chased it with vodka, lots of vodka.

Lonely Planet was the name of the show.

 

mimi

post #21 of 22

I bet the planet was lonely, if that's how they ate! smile.gif

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #22 of 22

I would dump it. But there are companies that buy this stuff. It is first boiled then shipped to a plant via special dedicated trucks. It then is used as a filling IE Pizza Rolls & Egg and Spring RollsI cant mention the brands but they are very popular. Bon Appitite

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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