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Railroad dining car service today and yesteryear

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I would like to hear from all who have rail dining experiences??? :eek:
"ones passion of food is of the heart and then of ones senses"

choo choo chef
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"ones passion of food is of the heart and then of ones senses"

choo choo chef
Reply
post #2 of 13
Welcome to Cheftalk, Choo Choo. Great name!

I have never eaten on a train before.

It would be fun however if you would share your experiences, i.e. I heard it can be very messy if you leave doors open while train goes through a sharp curve, stuff comes flying out! Seen that on a Canadian culinary show where chef ended up wearing breakfast instead of dishing it out to the waiters!

:eek:

[ May 09, 2001: Message edited by: pooh ]
I cook'n bake with passion...
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I cook'n bake with passion...
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post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
yes afra i would love to hear your story of dining on the rails!!! :D :D :D :eek: all aboard
"ones passion of food is of the heart and then of ones senses"

choo choo chef
Reply
"ones passion of food is of the heart and then of ones senses"

choo choo chef
Reply
post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 
dear pooh,

i use to live just south of you in Middlebury Vermont. i envy you. i miss the road trips to Montreal. especially the wine we would hide under the seats so as not to pay the taxes when we came back across the border. i also miss the snow.

just moments ago aboard our dining car we had a murder!!! not the death of a goose, but the death of a real scoundrel.

the murder took place just as we set the tomato bisque at table side . we were entering the 4 minute tunnel on our route thru the Natahala Gorge. The darkness held all of us untill we heard to loud pops and a sound of breaking dishes as we came out of the tunnel my wine steward lay across a table of four with a bullet hole in his chest. people started screaming....but no one moved. BEN THE DINING SREWARD was dead, the gun was nowhere to be found. but who did the dasterly deed. hmmmmmmmmmmmm i don't know but hopefully i can get dinner to my clients before ANY ONE ELSE DIES. the mystery is solved. we are in the middle of another MYSTERY ON THE
GREAT SMOKY MOUTAIN RAILWAY.

pOOH I WILL IN TRUTH WRITE YOU SOME OF THE MORE FUNNY STORIES AT A LATER date.

take care
"ones passion of food is of the heart and then of ones senses"

choo choo chef
Reply
"ones passion of food is of the heart and then of ones senses"

choo choo chef
Reply
post #5 of 13
Great story, choo choo and welcome!

I'm sure that's not what Pooh had in mind!?

I can't believe you said that! har-har!

I look forward to reading more...

:D
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
post #6 of 13
I've eaten on a train, sort of.....
We have a local "retired" train that has been converted into a restaurant. This was on a school field trip many, many years ago so we dined off of the childrens menu(hot dogs). :)

Svadhisthana
post #7 of 13
Svadhisthana brings back great memories. There was a wonderful retired train in Columbia, MO, called Katy Station that served the best warm pecan pie and coffee - perfect for a cold day Christmas shopping in the snow. Someday I'd like to take a cross country trip by rail...it seems like it would be the perfect way to leisurely see the country.
post #8 of 13
In my neighborhood, there used to be an old train station converted into a restaurant. Does it count?

;)


and welcome aboard, choo choo chef!

:rolleyes:

[ May 11, 2001: Message edited by: Kimmie ]
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 
i thank all of you for the telling of your many adventures on the train. let me take you on mine........all aboard...please go to www.gsmr.com i am off to move to a new house in these beautifull mountains. i will be off line for two weeks but will be back june 1, 2001 or sooner.

choo choo chefnull :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :D :D :D :confused: :)
"ones passion of food is of the heart and then of ones senses"

choo choo chef
Reply
"ones passion of food is of the heart and then of ones senses"

choo choo chef
Reply
post #10 of 13
Sounds soooooooo exciting! Have fun in the Great Smoky Mountains!

Choo-Choo!!!

:D
I cook'n bake with passion...
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I cook'n bake with passion...
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post #11 of 13
I worked in restaurant kitchens going to school and was a basic short order cook with some extra experience (1964-1970).

I worked on the Southern Pacific railroad for 27 years as break an and later Conductor.

When I worked on the passenger train instead of the freight line, you would find me hanging out with the cooks in the kitchen/dining car.

I also worked and was a guest on the Southern Pacific Railroad "private" rail cars...yep..hung out in the kitchen!

I collected dinnerware, manuals, etc..

Starting with breakfast, I remember all the toast being "grilled" over the charcoal in grills that were shaped a lot like an open double oven in homes in the 1970's...

French toast was made by dipping thick pieces of toast in large pots of beaten eggs with vanilla added and fried in large skillets of Wessen oil, sprinkled with white powered sugar and served with heated cups of maple syrup.

The kitchens were hooked up to the whole train steam line and many things used the steam...steam tables, deep cooking pots, hot water...almost like suse vide now....
post #12 of 13
I also worked as a conductor on the private dinner train in San Antonio Texas.

The meals were catered and heated onboard.
post #13 of 13
One of the "manuals" was like my folding timetable but for the waiters in the dining room. Since divorce I can't seem to locate the manual again.

I will never forget the unkind words (they would be now) in the language of the directions and admonition to waiters to "know your place". One of the requirements to waiters along that line was the requirement of two puncture holes in the pats of butter to ensure the guest that the butter had not been handled but was served from a fork so as not to have been touched by a hand.

Waiters had to line up in the dining room for each service with perfectly shined shoes and white clothing....this in spite of the crew being in a dormitory car that was cramped and hot for days on end.
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