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Rotten Tiger Shrimp?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I bought 2 lbs of frozen raw tiger shrimp the other day and thawed 1/2 lb. to make garlic shrimp. I normally prepare this recipe with white shrimp and have never cooked with/tasted tiger shrimp before. The shrimp taste was completely overpowering to me. Are tiger shrimp supposed to be so 'shrimpy'?

I also noticed that when I was thawing the shrimp out with some lukewarm water, there was a definite shrimp smell coming from them. Shouldn't raw shrimp have no smell?

And lastly, while eating them, one of the bites I took had a slightly firmer texture and a very slight ajaxy taste. Did I buy rotten shrimp? I was under the impression that all frozen shellfish are frozen in a fairly fresh state. Is it common to find frozen fish/shellfish that, when thawed, is not that fresh?

I'd like to get my money back but I'm hesitant to return them to the store since I don't have a clue what tiger shrimp are supposed to smell/taste like.
post #2 of 17
Tigers, like all shrimp should be firm and sweet when cooked.

The aromas and flavors you descibe certainly sound off.

Most shrimp, tigers included are flash frozen at sea in water blocks.IQFs are treated first then dry frozen.

I would suggest that you return these shrimp to were ever you purchased them without a second thought.
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #3 of 17
My unprofessional opinion is that if seafood passed off as fresh smells, then return it. I've had the same odoriferous experience as you, my friend.

What does IQF mean?

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

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Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks, that's helpful.

Cape Chef, I had read somewhere that black marks are a sign of not so fresh shrimp. My tiger shrimp had black marks - the tiger markings! Is that what tiger shrimp are supposed to look like?
post #5 of 17
scott123 , good advice you have been given . Seafood does not smell fishy when its taken from the waters . The fishy smell comes from the decomposition of the product . Shrimp to me have very little flavor but wonderfull texture when cooked properly . Thats why all shrimp dishes have some kind of sauce or court boullion that they are cooked in or accompanied with . The best thing you can do is return them and find out which store in your area has a good rep for seafood . Even then , I would stick my nose in it and smell and feel it ! Fishmongers are notorious for trying to get money from a product that is past its time ! enjoy the next batch my friend , Doug..................
The two most common things in the universe are hydrogen and stupidity !
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The two most common things in the universe are hydrogen and stupidity !
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post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks chefboy, the shrimp are going back :)

Kokopuffs, IQF means individually quick frozen. Just learned that myself.
post #7 of 17
Hi scott,

The "black" stripes on tiger shrimp are part and parcel to it's name sake.

Although very popular in Asia, it has been only the past 15 years or so tigers have gained popularity in the states. Many chefs we're at first taken back by the dark shell, but after working with them most were convinced that tigers were a good product.

BTW, they cook up nice and pink.

PS, soon we will be seeing fresh Eastcoast shrimp.........
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #8 of 17
The color difference depends on how long it was that the shrimp molted it carapace (shell) before it was harvested. It won't affect the quality of the shrimp. Tiger shrimp are now intensively aquacultured in Asia and that has brought the price down in recent years. Whenever seafood gets any type of off-odor like ammonia, throw it away or return it! NEVER EAT IT! YOU MIGHT GET FOOD POISONING! And shrimp seems to be a common culprit. HTH.
What a relief! To find out after all these years that I'm not crazy. I'm just culinarily divergent...
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What a relief! To find out after all these years that I'm not crazy. I'm just culinarily divergent...
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post #9 of 17
dude, if any seafood has the kitty litter smell (ie ammonia - then hasta la vista baby) its gotta go back.

on the other hand, distinct black markings (not just stripes but a general blackening of prawn flesh) denotes the action of advanced decay.

IMHO - i wouldnt use them and i would send them back

oh man - defrosted with lukewarm water - like not cold, hmm asking for trouble - best done o/nite in the coolroom or even in the sink - but not with hot/cold combo - just asking for lititgation there.
"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks for your concern, but there are no food safety issues here. Frozen shrimp take about 1 minute to thaw in lukewarm water. Then they go straight into the saute pan. Any time spent in the bacteria breeding 'zone' is miniscule.
post #11 of 17
yeah but you may be "cooking" the shrimp also giving it a flabby texture. Lukeworm is maybe bath temp? 100-120?
Just an aside from the bad shrimp thing but if you salt your shrimp for ~1min and rinse in cold water-do this 2 or 3 times before using it wil give the shrimp a snap. Old asian trick that works.
FWIW i get "mushy" shrimp now and then. Almost always related to holding one way or the other and it shows. Have had a batch of bug tails before-black is a bad sign. if block frozen its much easier to avoid than IQF.
hth, danny
post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
The temp is probably closer to 100 but even at 120, cooking (denaturing) doesn't occur. I will concede that the flavor/texture might be altered adversely by a lukewarm defrost. But I won't give on the safety issue :)

Thanks for extra info. The Asian salt trick and block freezing vs. IQF are good things to know.
post #13 of 17

Dano1

<<but if you salt your shrimp for ~1min and rinse in cold water-do this 2 or 3 times before using it wil give the shrimp a snap. >>

Please elaborate. Does one salt then rinse alternately 3 times? How long does the salt remain on the shrimp prior to rinsing? I need lessons on your OSMOTIC TECHNIQUE!!! ;)

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #14 of 17
scott123,

Yes, as mentioned above, seafood should never smell fishy, it should smell more like the ocean (not that most of America has had that opportunity). If you walk into a seafood market that smells, turn around and walk back out.
post #15 of 17
scott, i know wasn't even gonna ago there on the food safety issue ;).
Kokopuffs, salt liberally with kosher salt, let stand no more than 1 minute, rinse and repeat one or two times. Pat dry. Might try a tasting of unsalted vs. salted shrimp to see the difference. It's quite noticable in both taste and texture IMO. Gives the shrimp quite a pop when biting into them.

hth, danny
post #16 of 17
So that's kind of like "koshering" the shrimp, huh? :look: :lol:
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #17 of 17
[QUOTE=dano1] Just an aside from the bad shrimp thing but if you salt your shrimp for ~1min and rinse in cold water-do this 2 or 3 times before using it wil give the shrimp a snap. Old asian trick that works.

Another Asian method which I found even better for adding snap to shrimp is to hand whip the shrimp with Kosher salt with no additional water for up to 15 minutes. It's a lot more work than the brine soak, but the shrimp are crunchier.

If your a home cook, it's a great job to give to the guest who INSISTS on helping. If they are good friends who you can berate, be sure to say ever few minutes - "Whip them, don't just stir it!"

I will repeat what everyone else has said - NO seafood should smell fishy.

I too have had tiger shrimp that have tasted heavily iodized and/or super shrimpy. Tiger shrimp come from Southeast Asia, a tropical area very far away. So much can happen on the trip (but probably the damage is done inyour supermarket) that 1 in 10 batches may be off.

To me, tigers aren't particularly great tasting shrimp, but are a good buy when on sale.
Don't mess with dragons. You will be crispy and taste good with catsup.
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Don't mess with dragons. You will be crispy and taste good with catsup.
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