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Mycryo ??

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Has anyone ever used this product ? Mycryo "Meecreeyo" I saw a add in food arts and then did a search. The add said that it was a replacement for gelatin but I also saw a web site that said when added to tempered chocolate that it will hold the temper of chocolate ? Its made buy cacao barry and I did call up and get a sample + some info. I know that it is basically freeze dried cocoa butter but was curious if anyone has actually used it before? thanks

pat..

cacao barry / free sample 1-800-774-9131 ext-2375 / 2361
technical info and recipes - 1-800-774-9131 ext-2203

I called the first phone # and got all "sample,info,recipes"
post #2 of 9

Mycryo

I saw the ad the other day. I believe in the same magazine as you did. I will call tomorrow morning to get the samples. Did you try it? It says it enhances flavours! I want to try it in a semifreddo or a panna cotta!

Tell me, did you play with it? If so. how was it and what did you use it in.

Hope you don't mind sharing!

Gabi :chef:
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Gabi
I didnt get the sample yet in the mail but I did find a 4 kilo sample at my job yesterday that nobody knows how to use yet ? I guess the chef got it and I am hoping that he has some idea how it works. I wont see hime till thursday so until then..

pat..
post #4 of 9
I was on the phone today with a guy from Cacao Barry about this stuff. It is used at a rate of 1.5 to 1 to 1.8 to 1 in place of gelatin. It needs to be dissolved in liquid first, he said anything over 90 F will do it. The higher substitution amount would be for something like a mousse cake that would compress under it's own weight. He said it's more stable at room temp than gelatin, but basically, unless you got the insert that comes with it, or are willing to pony up the bucks for the book about it, it's all trial and error, but those substitution figures are a place to start. It leaves a product with a different mouthfeel from gelatin. It's set, but not firm, and when sliced has a soft melting texture to the cut edge rather than the clean slice you get with gelatin.

It also can be used for tempering chocolate. Melt the choc to 112, let cool to 90, for dark, and stir it in at 1% of the weight of the chocolate. I tried that, spread some on the bottom of an impeccable clean sheet pan, intending to try making some ruffles, and promptly forgot it. After two weeks, it was still shiny, and I added the mycryo before the chocolate had cooled down.
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It's not Dairy Queen.
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post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
thebighat
thanks for the info..about the tempering with mycryo..you said that it needs to be dissolved in liquid first ? So when you added it to the chocolate at 90 degrees at 1% of weight of chocolate did you dissolve it first or just add it to the chocolate as is ? and how much would you add for 1# of chocolate ? 1/4 oz or 1 1/2 t ?? thanks again

pat
post #6 of 9
The stuff goes right into the chocolate and should melt if the chocolate is at 90 degrees. 1% of a pound is .16 oz, so yeah, a little less than a quarter ounce would do it. I don't know what that is in volume measurements.
It's not Dairy Queen.
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It's not Dairy Queen.
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post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
thebighat
thank you very much, this has been exactly what I have been looking for..

pat
post #8 of 9
Hi
I have been making fruit ganache fillings for moulded chocolates, however I find that the fruit taste loses its punch when using chocolate to make the ganache. I am wondering if substituting some of the chocolate callets with mycryo could make a difference? And what proportions should I use.
Normally I would use 500 grams chocolate to 250grams fruit coulis
post #9 of 9

Ah you guys!  You've really been blinded by the Callebaut rep's tales of mystical properties of Mycro.

 

 

This is what Mycro is: 

100% cocoa butter, nothing added, nothing removed. 

 

To make Mycro, cocoa butter is heated, then sprayed (atomized) into a frozen chamber.  The result is small granules of pure beta 6 crystals.  Mycro is best used to help with tempering and pre-crystallization of ganache slabs, it is added in small (2-3%) amounts.. 

 

For everything else, pure cocoa butter will do--handsomely. 

 

Kinda like Xtra virg olive oil and plain olive oil, it makes no sense to saute or fry with the xtra virg--it makes no sense to use mycro for uses that plain cocoa butter will do.

 

I get plain cocoa butter from Kessko or Shokinag at prices well below half of what Mycro costs.

 

Callebaut doesn't like to sell pure cocoa butter in bulk-- other than Mycro, for obvious reasons of making more money.  That being said, the Belgians aren't the only Europeans making chocolate,  The Swiss, the French, the Italians and the Germans know a thing or two about chocolate as well.....

 

 

 

But the original posters question was finding something that didn't wash out the flavor of the liquids in the ganache.

 

The answer is easy, and it is right there in your kitchen:  White chocolate.

 

I've been using white couverture for my fruit ganaches for close to 10 years now, works great, lets other flavours come through.  Now I could give you my balanced ganache formula, with the long shelf life and the aW content of .674, but why would I do that?  I'd want 20% of what ever you were charging AND the rights to enslave your first born to my kitchen for  7 yr apprenticeship with no pay.

 

Just sub white for dark couverture  in a small batch of ganache and take it from there.  Might need some tweaking, but flavours will really come through.

 

No one's saying you can't use pure cocoa butter to the same effect, but it will cost more, and the taste of cocoa butter is bland--very much like a crappy peanut oil or the like.

 

Hope this was informative....

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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