or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Sugar Sculptures

post #1 of 43
Thread Starter 
Could someone please write instructions on how to make a simple sugar sculpture or refer me to a website?
post #2 of 43
:eek: Simple?
Take a pound of sugar, melt it and that's a simple sugar sculpture.

Anything past that, trust me is not that simple! Temperatures have to be accurate, the amount of acid added will be critical to too soft or too hard sugar. Isomalt will come into the discussion sooner or later, that's a whole 'nuther ball 'o' wax so to be speaking!

You may find recipes for making the sugar base but trust me sugar sculptures ain't simple!

Here's a link to where I went (many times :) )
http://www.notterschool.com/
My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
Reply
My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
Reply
post #3 of 43
Thread Starter 
thanks a lot
post #4 of 43
Like what chrose said, temperature is the name of the game here.
My limit research into my old books have yeilded the following temperatures

104C 220F Jelly
110C 230F Syrup
116C 24F Fudge/Soft Ball
121C 250F Firm Ball
127C 260F Hard Ball
138C 280F Soft Crack
149C 300F Hard Crack

For sugar sculptures, I think you want something between a Hard Ball to Soft Crack.
post #5 of 43
Vintor, I knew I had a basic recipe around here somewhere.
Dissolve 2# white sugar in 16 oz of cold water. Bring up the heat slowly and stir constantly. Bring the sugar to a boil and keep washing the sides.
As the sugar comes to a boil, skim the scum with a tea strainer. Depending on the purity of the sugar you may have to do this several times. After it comes to a full boil add 8 oz Glucose. Bring it to a boil, skim again and wash the sides down as necessary. If you are doing a one time piece that doesn't need a shelf life, you can finish the sugar now. However if you give the sugar more time to dissolve it stands a better chance of lasting and not crystallizing on you. So if you have the time you can remove the sugar from the heat after it boils after adding the glucose and cover tightly with plastic wrap. The plastic will suck in and as it cools condensation will form on the plastic. This is okay. Let it sit and cool for a day. When you are ready to finish it, uncover it and bring it back to a boil. Bring the sugar up to 280ºF. and add 15 drops of disolved Tartaric Acid (Available at good bakery supply stores) Bring the syup up to 309ºF and promptly remove from the heat. The sugar is now ready to pour onto a marble slab and turn into workable sugar. And that my friend is a whole nuther issue! If you just want to do pourings and breakable pieces for decoration you can do the same steps and omit the Tartaris Acid. For opaque pieces you can add Calcium Carbonate and White color to the syrup at about 258ºF.
If you want to color the sugar, dissolve a little powdered color in water just before the temp reaches the final stage. Liquid and paste colors contain other ingredients that can eventually break down the sugar so it's best to avoid them.
Basic sugar 101. Good luck.
My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
Reply
My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
Reply
post #6 of 43
I was doing research for my website on Sugar and I was put in contact with a Chef that is MASTER....I got to reviewing some of his work and there is no doubt why they call him the "SugarDaddy" he has a good article about sugar work at http://www.pastrychef.info/news.asp?Headline_ID=8

He is truly amazing...beats the heck out of my blown oranges and sugar roses...LOL

Cheffy
Trying to make a difference one palate at a time...

Want some more Cheffy Babbles????????
Cheffy's Blog
Reply
Trying to make a difference one palate at a time...

Want some more Cheffy Babbles????????
Cheffy's Blog
Reply
post #7 of 43
Cheffy,
That is a great article. It gives me even more information on sugar sculpting. My boss gave a class a few months back. He used isomalt, but really didn't give any insight about sugar and what to do with it. I am hoping one day to soon to set up my kitchen for sculpting in chocolate and sugar. Right now I am mostly just in awe of the masters.

Maggie :)
Now that's Pod-Racing
Reply
Now that's Pod-Racing
Reply
post #8 of 43
Vintor,
If your really interested in playing, you should get in contact with a local Pastry Chef in a good hotel and he or she should be able to turn you on to some isomalt. This is a more forgiving medium. You might start with poured sugar which only requires color and clay. A silpat is also helpful.

Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is To Short!!
Paninicakes.com

Reply

Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is To Short!!
Paninicakes.com

Reply
post #9 of 43
I have done a fair amount of sugar stuff, but the stuff that Chef Chiffers did is unbeleivable...I could never imagine the time and patience for some of his work...

If you didn't already go check out his personal website http://www.martinchiffers.com

This Chef is the MASTER

Talk to you soon,
Cheffy

PS...you are going to do Sugar out of your home? Would like to hear your ideas of what you are wanting to do...
Trying to make a difference one palate at a time...

Want some more Cheffy Babbles????????
Cheffy's Blog
Reply
Trying to make a difference one palate at a time...

Want some more Cheffy Babbles????????
Cheffy's Blog
Reply
post #10 of 43
Thanks for the link. Wow.
I want to start with poured first and then floral designs.
Start simple is my motto.

Thanks again :)
Maggie
Now that's Pod-Racing
Reply
Now that's Pod-Racing
Reply
post #11 of 43

Thanks

Thanks for the nice comments Cheffy a nice suprise to find this web page
www.martinchiffers.com
post #12 of 43
We are honored to have you among us, Chef Chiffers. Your work is amazing! We hope you enjoy this site and visit often.

Regards,
Mezzaluna
Welcome Forum moderator
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
post #13 of 43

Chef Chiffers

I was amazed at your email this afternoon...

Welcome to Chef Talk, am pretty honored to have you among us...

Instead of ranting and raving about your work, I just want you to know that I refer to both of your websites frequently and that I have attained a good amount of knowledge from your http://pastryarts.info site. Some good stuff, and anytime anyone asks me about sugar or some other pastry work that I know that you or your site has discussed I refer them to your sites.

You rock....

Look forward in hearing more from you.

Respectfully,
Michael
Trying to make a difference one palate at a time...

Want some more Cheffy Babbles????????
Cheffy's Blog
Reply
Trying to make a difference one palate at a time...

Want some more Cheffy Babbles????????
Cheffy's Blog
Reply
post #14 of 43
Oops...

Just realized I posted the wrong link...it is http://pastrychef.info

Sorry,
Cheffy
Trying to make a difference one palate at a time...

Want some more Cheffy Babbles????????
Cheffy's Blog
Reply
Trying to make a difference one palate at a time...

Want some more Cheffy Babbles????????
Cheffy's Blog
Reply
post #15 of 43

Thanks and a pleasure to be here

Thanks Cheffy and Mezzaluna,
www.Pastrychef.info has been some what neglected recently due to the pressures of work and life new born baby etc, but I hope to find time to upgrade it and add allot more information soon, I would welcome any info that I can add to it news, links, recipe are always welcome,
Its a pleasure to be on this site "chef talk" and will willingly give any advice if needed,

Ref: "isomalt" this is non hygroscopic so will not attract moisture so easily, working with it can be a little hot to handle but is great for poured sugar as it wont get stick so fast with humidity.

Martin Chiffers,
Pastry Chef Webmaster,
E-mail mailto:webmaster@pastrychef.info
website: http://www.pastrychef.info
website: http://www.martinchiffers.com
===================================
post #16 of 43
Martin, I enjoyed browsing through your site. Not only do you have an impressive array of work, but the site itself is well thought-out and high-tech. I hope you can find the time to revisit us now and then, even with a new baby (I know it's not easy). You are very talented!
post #17 of 43
Hi

I work now 18 years with sugar-- if anybody need any help (sugarwork,pastries or chocolates) --> i´m ready to help--sorry for my bad english -

I own a a Pastry- Shop in Austria --here some pic´s of sugar work--> i have done ;)


Pic1
Pic2
Pic3
Pic4
Pic5

PS. sorry ---most of the pics are bad --that time was no digi cam on market so i had to scann them


i work a lot with Isomalt -if you have the right recipie it will have the same temperiture as sugar (for sugar-pulling and blowing )

if you need/want my recipie let me know and i post it :)
post #18 of 43

Madi's Work

Hey Madi,

Looked at your pics, some cool stuff...

I am accumulating profiles and pictures of chef's and culinarians for publication on our website, if you would be interested, or anyone else for that matter, would love to include you in the "Tao of Being A Chef" section on RestaurantEdge...send me an email...

As far as your pics Madi, I would love to hear the stories behind the pics, some really cool stuff...

Respectfully,
Chef Mike
Trying to make a difference one palate at a time...

Want some more Cheffy Babbles????????
Cheffy's Blog
Reply
Trying to make a difference one palate at a time...

Want some more Cheffy Babbles????????
Cheffy's Blog
Reply
post #19 of 43
thx alot:) ok no problem i will mail you :)
---and my name is Madl -- :p like "l"ove **gg**:)
all the best
PS. i will send the mail to--->yourcraving@yahoo.com
is that ok with you?
post #20 of 43
alright my wife and my biggest fan thinks im super chef. i learned how to do wedding cakes im not bad at it i can definitly do beter then wal mart lol all on my own...but she was watching the sugar comp. in vegas on the food network and guess what i have to learn how to do mmmmm i read chef martins instuctions on how to get the sugar usable but is there some place i can find out how to start to get the basic shapes and build the moldes etc.
its something i really want to try and posibly mix in with my cakes
post #21 of 43
Go to pastrywiz.com. There is some instructions on how to make a swan or rose. But like the chefs said this isn't easy. Then there is all the equipment that you have to buy or find.You want another good reference checkout The Professional Pastry Chef [/U]by Bo Friberg or "The Advanced Professional Pastry" [U]Chef by Bo Friberg both are excellnet books and devote entire chapters to sugar work and gives you some insight on how to make some of the needed equipment. I have both and there agian they are not cheap books. This is an art that takes years to master. And I think the chefs will agree with me when I say most only have time to do it has a hobby because most commerical kitchens are not set up for sugar work. And that site they gave you International School of Confectionary Arts. Well that is Ewald and Susan Notter the worlds best at sugar art.
post #22 of 43
it´s thrue--it will take a lot of time to learn that--but i feel it is the best for
wedding cakes and showpieces
http://www.patisserie-madl.at/
post #23 of 43
:chef:Hey guys. I have this really good pouring sugar recipe.
If anyone wants it just pm me. I think you guys would really like it.
CHICKEN
Reply
CHICKEN
Reply
post #24 of 43
Oh and does anyone know where I can geta cheap sugar working starter kit?
CHICKEN
Reply
CHICKEN
Reply
post #25 of 43
Best build it yourself most of the stuff you can make. But if you want to buy it go to Albert Usters website or go here www.pastrywiz.com

Rgds Rook
post #26 of 43
To start out in sugar you can buy a sugar pump at a medical supply house only it is not for sugar LOL. The pump is the same as for taking blood pressure. Just affix a small aluminum tube (from any hobby store or home depot) in the end and you are good to go. Most things you need can be bought from other sources than chef's supply places and you will save $$$.

If anyone in the New Jersey/Philadelphia area wants to learn I'mglad to help out.
Fluctuat nec mergitur
Reply
Fluctuat nec mergitur
Reply
post #27 of 43
To add onto to Rat's advice you will need:

Heavy duty pot. Copper's nice but not really necesary. A good sandwiched bottom s/s pot will do just fine.

A real good thermometer. Any Shop that sells Kitchen gadgets will do just fine.

A sil-pat or silicone rubber mat. Any Restaurant supply house will have these. 'Course, you can get these at kitchen gadget shops, but you'll pay a premium.

Heat lamp. Mine is a cheap Ikea student's lamp, the kind with those elbows and springs that you can adjust anywhere. All you need is a heat light-bulb, they screw into regular sockets, and you'll find these at Restaurant supply houses, the same bulbs in carvng station lamps.

Cream of tartar OR Tartaric acid cyrstals. They are not interchangable. You can find cream of tartar in most supermarkets. This, however is not water soluable. If your recipei calls for dissolved tartaric acid, you will find tartaric acid crystals at U-brew/ wine shops.

Food colouring. Use the cheapo stuff for now.

For casting sugar pieces, a set of metal bars is very handy. I went to a shop that sells fabricated metal pieces and got myself some 3/8" x 3/8" s/s bars; 2 pcs 4", 2 pcs 6", and 2 pcs 8". I also got myself some plasticene. I repeat, plasticene, not cheap kiddies playdough. The cheap stuff can't take the heat and will melt. Plasticene can be found at art supply stores.

Oh, and you'll need patience, peace and quiet, and some good tunes too...
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #28 of 43
Do any of you know if smart and final will have some sugar working stuff?
And what do i need cream of tartar or tartaric acid for?
CHICKEN
Reply
CHICKEN
Reply
post #29 of 43
Cream of tartar or tartaric acid inhibits crystallization, mostly.

What I want to know is how you sugar artists get past the pain. I've taken a couple of sugar pulling classes, and have been fine handling the sugar on day one, but the blisters on my hands are so bad by day 2 that I can't even bear to hold anything warm. This alone, has prevented me from pursuing the art.
Do I just have really wimpy hands, or am I just a wimp in general?:lol:
post #30 of 43
try wearing latex gloves or any other types of gloves.
CHICKEN
Reply
CHICKEN
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Professional Pastry Chefs