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Seasoning of Stainless Steel fry pan - Page 2

post #31 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Recky View Post

Season SS pans???? This is a completely new one on me. Cast or rolled iron, of course, but SS???

Yes, some people like to season stainless steel. Personally I don't. I only season my carbon steel. 

post #32 of 57

Hi, first reply, long time lurker. I spent 5 years as a  professional brewer and caring for and cleaning the stainless steel tanks was a big part of the job, so I know a fair bit about SS. 

 

Adding salt directly to a stainless pan is a bad idea--it will cause pitting. The chloride attacks the passivation  layer which is what keeps SS from rusting. Bleach will do the same thing. The other big no-no are steel-wool pads--they cause tiny particles of steel to become embedded in the SS which creates a nucleation point for the formation of rust. 

 

According to All-Clad's FAQ http://www.all-clad.com/Pages/Customer%20Service/faqs.aspx "For daily cleaning, warm, soapy water is sufficient. Clean your All-Clad thoroughly after each use. Food films left on the pan may cause discoloration and sticking... To get rid of stuck-on food or discolouration, and stains from using too high a heat, we recommend cleaning your All-Clad with a specialist stainless steel cleaning product called ‘Bar Keeper's Friend’."

 

To prevent sticking: "A preheated pan and lower flames are the key to stick-free stainless steel cooking.  Preheat your pan on low or medium heat for one to two minutes. Tap the upper edge of your pan to test the heat.  (If it is too hot, remove from the burner for a couple of minutes.) Pour 2-3 teaspoons of cold oil in your preheated pan-or enough to cover the bottom of the cooking surface. Add food, making sure that there is an even sizzling sound when your food touches the pan. This indicates that your food is cooking on contact and creating a natural barrier to prevent sticking.  Allow  food to cook without disturbing it until the correct doneness is achieved.  The natural sugars in your food caramelize on the cooked surface, developing great flavours and lifting your food off of the cooking surface naturally.  If the sound that food makes on initial contact with the pan is more of a crackle than a sizzle, your heat is too high and sticking may occur. All-Clad recommends low to medium heat for frying, braising, sauteing and simmering because All-Clad is ideally crafted to hold heat. ​​" IOW, unlike carbon steel pans, SS does not appear to require seasoning...

 

harlan.

post #33 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by harlan View Post

IOW, unlike carbon steel pans, SS does not appear to require seasoning...

 

Correct, SS does not require seasoning. That doesn't mean you can't season them if you want to. Some chefs like to season theirs to create a non-stick surface. 

post #34 of 57

Being the cook in our home and trying to learn all things culinary, it sounds like carbon steel and cast iron are the best there is for a serious cook.  I have three questions, first where do I go to get very good carbon steel cookware, second, would sandblasting my cast iron cookware and starting over with a proper seasoning technique help even out hot spots, and lastly will a ceramic chefs knife keep an edge better and Damascus steel.

post #35 of 57
This thread is why I joined ChefTalk. After I bought my first set of SS cookware (yes, a set) I managed to stick and destroy just about everything I put in a skillet and was losing hope that I would ever be able to fry another egg again. I knew it could be done because I've seen other people do it. I cam across instructions on how to season a SS pan and gave it a try. No salt involved. Worked like a charm. But one of the reasons I switched over to SS was that I like that gleaming cleanliness look it has so it just didn't sit well leaving it oily and kind of sticky feeling so I washed off the seasoning. Maybe if I ever get another pan that I can reserve just for eggs I will do it again because it really did work well. Now I just let the pan get hot, add oil and let it get hot, then add the eggs. Works well enough if you have the time to let the pan get to the right temps before adding the oil and then again before adding the eggs. It would be a time saver to have a pre-seasoned pan reserved just for eggs.
post #36 of 57

Or, do what a lot of people do and keep one non-stick pan just for eggs. Use your stainless for everything else.

post #37 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by hotstuff View Post

I came across this method via proffesional chefs specifying to use iodized salt as it contains SILICON!! I believe it is the "silicon" that is the active ingredient and solve to your ponderings.


Your professional chefs were full of crap.  Iodized salt is salt (sodium-chloride) and iodine.  There is no silicon involved.  Furthermore, silicon is not non-stick.  I fear your professional chefs confused it with silicone. 

 

Those of you pondering, may continue to do so with ponderings unsolved.

 

BDL

post #38 of 57
Originally Posted by Veggie View Post

Maybe if I ever get another pan that I can reserve just for eggs I will do it again because it really did work well. Now I just let the pan get hot, add oil and let it get hot, then add the eggs. Works well enough if you have the time to let the pan get to the right temps before adding the oil and then again before adding the eggs. It would be a time saver to have a pre-seasoned pan reserved just for eggs.

 

If you ever do get another pan which you can reserve just for eggs, you're still going to have to preheat it; so no time savings.  You'll have to continue to set your alarm clock two minutes earlier than you otherwise might. 

 

Alas!  You're still going to need to add at least some butter or oil if you want the eggs to taste good. 

 

BDL

post #39 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoTerry View Post

Or, do what a lot of people do and keep one non-stick pan just for eggs. Use your stainless for everything else.

 

The other reason I switched to SS is that I don't like non-stick.  Had a set of anodized non-stick and got tired of having to baby it.  Not to mention the issues with chemicals and flaking. I have a tendency to turn up the heat too high.  If other people want that I don't mind but this girl already has an autoimmune disease that is affecting my liver.  I'm opting not to expose myself to any chemicals in my food I can avoid, no matter how minute the risk.  The upside to that is that it has forced me to use real whole foods and I really cook more than I ever did before.  I've been taken out of my comfort zone and am learning a lot of new stuff, like how to cook in SS pans. 

post #40 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

 

If you ever do get another pan which you can reserve just for eggs, you're still going to have to preheat it; so no time savings.  You'll have to continue to set your alarm clock two minutes earlier than you otherwise might. 

 

Alas!  You're still going to need to add at least some butter or oil if you want the eggs to taste good. 

 

BDL


Of course, you're right, the pan still has to heat up but the seasoning did take a little of the guess work out of when was the right time to add the egg.  Being that it was essentially non-stick putting the eggs in a bit early didn't mean certain disaster.  I'm still having some trouble with the timing.  Probably because it seems to take forever to heat up and I get impatient.  The multiple layers on the bottom of my pans are probably to blame for that.  I do manage to pull it off occasionally though. :)

post #41 of 57

Hi,

As a first time writer, I apologise to jump in here (Mods: please feel free to move)

 

Until I get a new hob, I am using an electric aluminium frying pan.

I don’t like sanitising frying pans, or Tea pots come to that.

 

This pan is used for multi cooking.  Many years ago I read about 'cooking' salt in frying pans, to help to seal/season them, which helps towards a non-stick surface.  I used it a few times, but I really don’t know if it helped or not.

 

Reluctantly, I had to wash / scour this pan yesterday & was about to use the salt routine, again to help the 'non stick' idea. 

 

I thought I’d look on the ‘net for others opinions & came across this great debate.

 

As above – my pan is alloy, so may need a different system – any advice on this please ?

 

Also:

 

My new hob will be Induction. 

I am looking into the Stonewall / Ceramicore frying pans.  Their blurb says that even though they are based on aluminium they are suitable for Induction hobs. 

I’ve been in touch with the manufacturers (a few times - as their initial replies were “yes – they are o.k for Induction” but didn’t offer more details until pressed.)  Apparently, there is 12% s.steel in the base.

 

Has anyone used these pans on Induction hobs please ?

 

Thanks for a great site & ‘grater’ help & advice.

 

F

post #42 of 57

I'm a retailer of kitchen goods, and a fan of induction, though I have heard stories of electronic problems.  A few years ago I tested Viking 7 ply against Chantal Copper Fusion on a single burner induction hob.  

 

The Chantal has an iron plate as part of the pan bottom, while the Viking is the typical clad SS exterior and interior over aluminum.  Since induction requires iron to create heat, the induction plates in "true" induction ready pans will perform better.  I found the Chantal heated faster, and to much higher temperatures than the Viking. So, for lower temp. cooking stainless may be fine, but for fast response and higher temps seek out a pan with more iron. Try cast iron, carbon steel, or pans with an induction plate as part of the bottom.

 

I have wondered if the low iron content in SS pans may contribute to electronic problems with induction.  Any insight out there?

 

Video on seasoning stainless steel

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1376ITxF1Oc

 

Video on seasoning carbon steel:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=xoIO8YOpyN4

post #43 of 57

"Seasoning your Stainless Steel"

 

This is the way we are trained today.  Take 2 tablespoons of salt and place it in the bottom of your Stainless Steel egg pan. Rub the salt into the pan with a papertowell or napkin in a clockwise, or counter clockwise motion for a couple of minutes.  "This actually acts like an abrassive on the metal and makes it prepares the metal for seasoning".  

 

Next wipe out the salt with a clean napkin or paper towell and discard the salt.

 

Fill the pan about 1" deep with some buttery oil mixture into the pan and heat the pan on a low to medium heat for about 15 to 30 minutes.  You do not want the heat to get so hot that it is burning.  Just keep it below that level.

 

For best results do not wash this pan in soapy water, or a dish washer especially.  Continue to wipe the pan out after use with a clean cotton cloth.

 

After you begin using your pan, At some point you will need to start this process over because egg will begin to cook to long in your pan, or the pan will begin to have a carbon build up.  

 

If you are just using the pan for home use, you won't have to start over that often.  In a restaurant atmosphere, you might have to season the pans every day.

post #44 of 57

Seasoning isn't carbon. It is polymerized unsaturated fatty acids. The stuff that has the most unsaturated fatty acids and is best suited for seasoning is flaxseed oil. our grandparents used to do it with lard, but back then pigs were fed on a different diet, nowadays there are almost no unsaturated fatty acids in lard.

 

For the perfect seasoning you wipe down a clean cast iron or forged/rolled steel skillet with a very thin layer of flaxseed oil, wipe it "off" again with a clean kitchen tissue (there will still be layer of oil there don't worry. If you leave out this step your seasoning will be splotchy and ugly) and stick it in the oven for an hour at 200°Celsius. Do that five times and your seasoning is a good as it will ever get.

 

Stainless steel cannot be really seasoned but can also be made almost non stick with the proper procedure. You heat the dry, empty pan until some sprinkled in water droplets float like quicksilver instead of evaporating, then you pour in some oil, coat the pan with it and bring it to its smoking point. Hold it there for a minute or three, then pour out the excess oil and wipe it clean with a kitchen tissue. Now the pan is ready. For best results always let the pan get hot enough that food "hisses" as soon as it touches the pan. That sound means that the moisture in the food imediately forms a layer of steam between the food and the pan  and it doesn't really get the chance to stick. Stainless doesn't take a permanent seasoning like the other stuff so the process with the smoking oil must be reapeated each time you clean it with dishwascher fluid.

 

 

 

 

post #45 of 57

This is the way we learned at the WAFFLE HOUSE;

 

We use only Stainless Steel.

 

The reason we SEASON OUR EGG PANS:  For the important non-stick property.

 

1.  First we take about 2 tablespoons of salt and pour into the bottom of the pan.

2.  Next we take an unused napkin or paper towell and use it to rub the salt in either a clockwise, or counter clockwise circular movement for a couple of minutes using as much force as you can. ( In theory we are using the salt to hone down the rough edges of the pan, and making the pan have a polished effect. (Non-stick surface)

3.  Dump the salt in the waste can and wipe it clean in the same circular motion as you were previously.

4.  Once the surface of the pan is clean and salt free and the gray substance is wiped out of the pan, your pan will shine brighter than before.

5.  Now take some of your preferred oil, (At WAFFLE HOUSE we use a butter-shortening pre-mixed bottled oil).  Poor about an inch deep of oil in the pan and let it heat for about an hour in the pan.

6.  Just prior to you using the pan to cook your eggs pour the oil out except for enough to coat the bottom and walls of the pan.

7.  Now you can cook a great order of over medium eggs.

8.  Once you have cooked this order of eggs, you should take a clean cotton cloth and just give the pan a quick clockwise wipe and it will be clean enough for repeated use.

9. add a few ounces of oil back to the pan and set it on a low heat awaiting it's next order of over mediums.

 

Remember that once you either hit the bottom of your pan with your cooking utensils, overheat, or wash with soap and water, the pan will need to be prepared all over again.

 

Note: The purpose of the salt is that it works as a sanitary abrasive so you may use your product to cook food and serve it without contamination.

 

S

SargentChef

post #46 of 57

My aluminum fry pan is dedicated to eggs and I use butter for the cooking medium.  When finished cooking eggs, I simply rinse with hot water and a plastic scouring pad.  And the pan is good to go for the next round of cooking eggs.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #47 of 57
Here is what I know I wish I would of looked at this thread first crap I have some scrubbing to do frown.giffrown.gif
post #48 of 57

As a PhD Chemist, the salt in the seasoning of SS pans has 2 roles:-

 

   1.  It acts as a dehydrating agent, removing any water from the oil, and from the surface of the pan.

   2.  It is an effective scouring agent, helping to remove any dirt from the open pores of the steel when it is hot (metal pres are open when hot

 

On cooling, the pores take on a monolayer of oil/ carbon, creating the non-stick surface.

 

This precess is one of the few things you can do to prevent old SS pans from sticking.  You might need to repeat several times, avoiding washing in between.  Each time the pan will become more and more 'non-stick'.

post #49 of 57
I season my pans and after a few uses I have to reseason them? Can you please tell me what I'm doing wrong I only wash with hot water.
post #50 of 57

All the above crap about salt, dehydration and carbon is just that... crap.

 

No offense to a PhD Chemist (what ever the hell that is) I also know several Civil Engineers that can't properly hammer a nail or drive a screw.

 

Here is the best written guide - that uses commons sense and 'gasp' science to explain how to season cast iron and/or carbon steel pans.

 

http://sherylcanter.com/wordpress/2010/01/a-science-based-technique-for-seasoning-cast-iron/

 

Read it and follow it to the letter - lots of people skip the step that says "Now rub it all off".

 

The entire key is held in this single factual sentence:

The seasoning on cast iron is formed by fat polymerization, fat polymerization is maximized with a drying oil, and flaxseed oil is the only drying oil that’s edible.

 

For emphasis the pan on the left is poorly seasoned.   The pan on the right is properly seasoned.  It is the same pan in each photo!

 

Griswold skillet closeups: old seasoning on left, new seasoning on right 

 

Read the article.  Do it!

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #51 of 57

not to be too upset, Recky.

 

there are people who still believe the earth is flat.

post #52 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelGA View Post
 

For emphasis the pan on the left is poorly seasoned.   The pan on the right is properly seasoned.  It is the same pan in each photo!

Wow. A picture is worth a thousand words! I can only dream of having my carbon steel pan seasoned so beautifully. Even the pic on the left would be an improvement for me. I read the article, now I need to find the time to do it. Thanks!

post #53 of 57

Carbon steel will be a bit more grey and not so black but it will be smooth and non-stick as any cast-iron.

 

I spent the entire weekend Sat&Sun a few years back Cooking all my pans properly.  

A thousand curses from the wife and way too much smoke but boy are they nice to cook in!  (even on my supremely crappy ceramic top stove... gah!)

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #54 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelGA View Post
 

Carbon steel will be a bit more grey and not so black but it will be smooth and non-stick as any cast-iron.

 

I spent the entire weekend Sat&Sun a few years back Cooking all my pans properly.  

A thousand curses from the wife and way too much smoke but boy are they nice to cook in!  (even on my supremely crappy ceramic top stove... gah!)

Oh those pics were cast iron? Didn't realize that. Thanks for the precisions. Yeah that's my issue I don't think the wife and kids would be too happy about all the smoke so I'm going to figure out some time when they're away, or maybe use the outdoor gas grill? 

post #55 of 57

Have to try the salt trick on my SS pans.

At this very moment i'm seasoning a new carbon steel paella. Wish i had some flaxseed oil but i dont.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #56 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by ordo View Post
 

Have to try the salt trick on my SS pans.

At this very moment i'm seasoning a new carbon steel paella. Wish i had some flaxseed oil but i dont.

 

Save your salt... it doesn't do anything.

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #57 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 

Oh those pics were cast iron? Didn't realize that. Thanks for the precisions. Yeah that's my issue I don't think the wife and kids would be too happy about all the smoke so I'm going to figure out some time when they're away, or maybe use the outdoor gas grill? 

 

If you can keep your grill evenly hot it should work.    Maybe throw a pizza steel or baking steel underneath to keep the heat even.

 

The final temp isn't really that important it just has to polymerize (burn) the oil.  

 

hmm... wish I would have thought of that earlier.

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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