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Biggest Problem Facing Young Chefs - Page 2

post #31 of 34
lukeygina,
In every kitchen I have worked in, I have never "commanded" respect, I have EARNED it. After 25+ years, my name and reputation have earned the respect I am due. I never called myself "chef" until it was bestowed upon me by someine I respected. I still consider myself a cook and a teacher of food, but after many years of hard work, have earned the title "chef".

I agree too many young culinaruians are pushed too fast into upper positions, and never learn to respect those that came before. Look at all the Food Channel cooks (no I cannot call them chefs), they put out classic dishes as if they just invented something new! No respect for the CHEFS who actually did the work. I think every cook should spend some time in the dishroom, as a busser in the dining room, and most assuredly work their way through the kitchen. Then they are ready to suggest possible menu items to a manger for consideration as a weeknight special.

Keep your head and learn from the people you work for!
We have done so much with so little for so long, we can now do almost anything with almost nothing. Dave Marcis

Eat Well
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We have done so much with so little for so long, we can now do almost anything with almost nothing. Dave Marcis

Eat Well
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post #32 of 34

Supervisor from ****

yes, you are right,

Cooks that go up too fast, usually lack of proper judgement in harsh situation they can't deliver!!

Amen!
Martin Laprise
Author of "My daughter wants to Be a Chef!"
www.thechefinstead.ca

“A cook who invest a few bucks every week is a smart cook"
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Martin Laprise
Author of "My daughter wants to Be a Chef!"
www.thechefinstead.ca

“A cook who invest a few bucks every week is a smart cook"
Reply
post #33 of 34
Totally agree with the statement about earning respect. You can't make someone like you, and you can't make someone respect you. You have to respect them first, reciprocation comes afterwards...
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #34 of 34
[QUOTE=CampChef]lukeygina,


In every kitchen I have worked in, I have never "commanded" respect, I have EARNED it. After 25+ years, my name and reputation have earned the respect I am due. I never called myself "chef" until it was bestowed upon me by someine I respected. I still consider myself a cook and a teacher of food, but after many years of hard work, have earned the title "chef". QUOTE]

Lukeygina, what Campchef has said here is an absolute truth. This is probably the most concise way of teaching you what respect is about. I too have never called myself "Chef" until it was bestowed on me also. I never insisted that anyone uses the label in addressing me. Rather all of my employees call me chef anyways and sometimes when years have passed I may run into an old employee in which he will introduce his freinds to me and then say to his friends that this man (me) is "my chef". I recieved this respect not because I stamped my feet, throw hissy fits and "command" that I be addressed as this empirical royal Chef; rather I did it by not doing so. I earned it in their eyes and I treated them with respect. I am demanding about the quality and standards that I adhere to but I am not abusive in addressing them in reaching this daily goal. Basicaly, I provided a good example to follow and I genuinely care about my crew. That is the best route to go.
David
Hard work never killed anybody but it sure has scared a lot of them.
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Hard work never killed anybody but it sure has scared a lot of them.
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