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cooking methods

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
how many cooking methods do we have, the other day a chef told me 8, i was surprised, for me there are 14.

hans
post #2 of 28
Is sous vide considered a technique? I've always wondered about what's considered a cooking method.

Saute, steam, boil, poach, broil, grill, deep fry, roast. That's eight. :)
post #3 of 28
What about smoke, cure, marinate (as in ceviche), dry or dehydrate? Are those considered cooking or processing?
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post #4 of 28
Where does braise come in?
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post #5 of 28
Again this is a lot to do with what they want you to know. Off the top of my head I can come up with many. Wet: Poaching, steaming, boiling, simmering.
Dry: Roasting, grilling, sauteing, frying, deep frying, broiling, baking. Combination: Stewing, braising.
Then there are miscellaneous as cheflayne mentioned but I don't think they would be included as cooking techniques in a curriculum.
post #6 of 28
Thread Starter 

cooking methods

in addition to your list of which i agree, we also have glazing [white meat or vegetables] and butter roasting [mainly used for chicken]

simmering and boiling we consider as one, as it is only the temperature which is lower in simmering.

curing and others mentioned are preservation methods.

hans
post #7 of 28

What would you call a cooking method where you start out frying some meat, then add seasoning on it and a little water in the pan and braise, then take the lid off to reduce the sauce?

 

I just did pork chops like that, with Pickapeppa sauce and TryMe habanero sauce. Turned out great.

post #8 of 28
There is also confit.
Quote:
Originally Posted by OregonYeti View Post

What would you call a cooking method where you start out frying some meat, then add seasoning on it and a little water in the pan and braise, then take the lid off to reduce the sauce?

I just did pork chops like that, with Pickapeppa sauce and TryMe habanero sauce. Turned out great.

I don't call this frying, just sautéing. And I don't use water, I use stock or wine or cream or a combo of them all. I don't know what it is technically referred to.

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post #9 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by OregonYeti View Post
 

What would you call a cooking method where you start out frying some meat, then add seasoning on it and a little water in the pan and braise, then take the lid off to reduce the sauce?

 

I just did pork chops like that, with Pickapeppa sauce and TryMe habanero sauce. Turned out great.

 

Technically it is a braise.  All good braises should start out with the meat being browned via frying or sautéing.

post #10 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete View Post
 

 

Technically it is a braise.  All good braises should start out with the meat being browned via frying or sautéing.

 

I don't think so.  A braise has a distinct purpose, and that is to slowly cook meat and break down connective tissue.  Slow cooking is engrained in a braise.  But a pork chop or a chicken breast does not need to braise.  This is a quick thing, a quick sautee, then a deglaze, and then finishing off the cooking in the sauce.

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post #11 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

 

I don't think so.  A braise has a distinct purpose, and that is to slowly cook meat and break down connective tissue.  Slow cooking is engrained in a braise.  But a pork chop or a chicken breast does not need to braise.  This is a quick thing, a quick sautee, then a deglaze, and then finishing off the cooking in the sauce.

 

 

Sorry, but I have to disagree. I do agree that braising lends itself to cooking large pieces of tough meat and that it what it is often used for, but that doesn't have to be the case.  According to Wayne Gisslen in "Professional Cooking" a braise  means (1) To cook covered in a small amount of liquid, usually after preliminary browning. (2) To cook (certain vegetables) slowly in a small amount of liquid without preliminary browining.

 

Julia Child agrees in "Mastering the Art of French Cooking" defining braise as: To brown foods in fat, then cook them in a covered casserole with a small amount of liquid.

 

James Paterson, in "Glorious French Food" uses the term in the title of one of his dishes, "Braised Sole" which only cooks for a couple of minutes after the fish fumet comes to a simmer.

 

Even Paul Bocuse implies that "braise" has a larger definition as he only states, in "Paul Bocuse's French Cooking" that a braise applies primarily to large cuts of meat....

post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete View Post
 

 

Technically it is a braise.  All good braises should start out with the meat being browned via frying or sautéing.

 

Thanks. It took a while for me to learn that browning the meat at first makes a lot of difference whatever the following steps are. Even if it's a pot "roast", it tastes much better if the meat was browned first.


Edited by OregonYeti - 7/7/16 at 9:26pm
post #13 of 28

Does cooking in acid count like in a ceviche count ?  ?  ?

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Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Wer den Pfennig nicht ehrt,

Ist des Talers nicht wehrt !

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post #14 of 28
Ceviche isn't really "cooked", its a chemical reaction from an acid.

Smoking and salting aren't cooking methods either, they are preservation methods. Just because you can salt an entire side of cod, doesn't mean you can eat it.
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post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete View Post


Sorry, but I have to disagree. I do agree that braising lends itself to cooking large pieces of tough meat and that it what it is often used for, but that doesn't have to be the case.  According to Wayne Gisslen in "Professional Cooking" a braise  means (1) To cook covered in a small amount of liquid, usually after preliminary browning. (2) To cook (certain vegetables) slowly in a small amount of liquid without preliminary browining.

Julia Child agrees in "Mastering the Art of French Cooking" defining braise as: To brown foods in fat, then cook them in a covered casserole with a small amount of liquid.

James Paterson, in "Glorious French Food" uses the term in the title of one of his dishes, "Braised Sole" which only cooks for a couple of minutes after the fish fumet comes to a simmer.

Even Paul Bocuse implies that "braise" has a larger definition as he only states, in "Paul Bocuse's French Cooking" that a braise applies primarily to large cuts of meat....
Can't argue with this. But still, when I set out to make a meal like this I can't call it a braise. A braise in my kitchen is a a slow thing, set it and forget it. While this is a quick cooking method, can't leave the kitchen for a second while cooking this way. All technicalities aside it is what it is. It might be a braise but it needs the attention of a sautée. I really think a new term should be coined.

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post #16 of 28
Is smoking a separate cooking method? I'd think so.
post #17 of 28

No, it's not.  Its a method for flavouring, as well as a method for preservation. Just because bacon is smoked, doesn't mean you can eat it.  I've smoked a lot of chicken breasts, but I still had to cook them afterwards

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post #18 of 28
Please help. So all that barbecue made in smokers isn't made by a cooking method? Is it grilling, but with smoke?? Trying to understand why BBQ experts are always adament that grilling is not the same. What's the ultimate source of terminology here? I understan You can 'smoke' without fully cooking, but is that just 'cold smoking'?
post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Midlife View Post

Please help. So all that barbecue made in smokers isn't made by a cooking method? Is it grilling, but with smoke?? Trying to understand why BBQ experts are always adament that grilling is not the same. What's the ultimate source of terminology here? I understan You can 'smoke' without fully cooking, but is that just 'cold smoking'?

 

Midlife, there is a lot to unpack in your questions.  I'll see if I can help.  Smoking is not a "cooking method".  It is a preservation method, or at least was way back before refrigeration.  It's end goal back then was not to "cook" the food but to preserve through the use of smoke, which does have preservative qualities to it as well as by drying it out which helps preserve food. This is in addition to the preservation already achieved through the curing process which most smoked foods first undergo.  That's why, if you read old accounts of smoking hams, they were often smoked for days or even weeks.  I would argue that today's barbecue techniques really are a variation on roasting.  It is a slow roasting method, over live fire, with the addition of smoke.

 

When it comes to difference between grilling and barbecue, there are a lot of nuances, but the main difference is the intensity of the heat and the placement of the meat (or other food product) in relation to that heat.  In grilling the food is meant to be cooked in a relatively short amount of time, normally less than 30 minutes.  Much of the cooking is done directly over the heat source, or at the very least, in close proximity to an intense heat source as in indirect grilling.  Barbecuing, on the other hand, is a slow and low cooking process that usually requires many hours.  The heat source is often (although not always) located in a separate area of the equipment, or built in such a way as to keep it as far from the food as possible.  The heat source is also built to generate as little heat as possible while maximizing the amount of smoke created.  In grilling, temperatures where the meat is cooked can reach 500-600°F, or higher, whereas in barbecuing, temperatures are generally kept at approximately 225-275°F.  This is a very simplification of the differences between grilling and barbecuing, and I imagine that many of my barbecue crazy friends will chime in with their take on the differences.  There are a whole lot of ifs, ands, and buts, to my comparison, but again, this is a simplification.  I could really go on and on about the differences.

post #20 of 28
Thanks so much. Very edifying. Can't wait 'til the next time I get into a discussion around BBQ vs. Grilling. Will need to duck the flying Bud cans.
post #21 of 28

"James Paterson, in "Glorious French Food" uses the term in the title of one of his dishes, "Braised Sole" which only cooks for a couple of minutes after the fish fumet comes to a simmer"

 

Pete,

 

I would not call this method braising.  I would call this  "Poached Sole."  A chef can call a dish whatever pleases them.  Your BBQ vs. grill was good.  I was taught there are two categories of cooking methods,  Dry and moist.

post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimyra View Post
 

"James Paterson, in "Glorious French Food" uses the term in the title of one of his dishes, "Braised Sole" which only cooks for a couple of minutes after the fish fumet comes to a simmer"

 

Pete,

 

I would not call this method braising.  I would call this  "Poached Sole."  A chef can call a dish whatever pleases them.  Your BBQ vs. grill was good.  I was taught there are two categories of cooking methods,  Dry and moist.

No, can't be because nothing can be poached while it's simmering.

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post #23 of 28
Quote: The New Larousse Gastrronomque
 Poaching, POCHAGE --- Poaching is a gentle simmering in liquid.
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post #24 of 28

Thank you Cheflayne.  Many cooks have trouble with poached eggs because they use rapidly boiling water instead of simmering.

post #25 of 28

I can't poach anything effectively if it's simmering, bubbles pose a big problem, no matter how small.

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post #26 of 28

How do you poach?

post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimyra View Post
 

How do you poach?

I bring the liquid to a simmer and then turn down to the lowest setting.  Add the egg, fish or whatever and wait.

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post #28 of 28

Practical Professional Cookery (Harry L. Cracknell & Ronald J. Kaufmann) lists 13 methods and is the standard by which Australian Apprentices are trained:

Boiling

Poaching

Steaming

Stewing

Braising

Poeling or Pot-Roasting

Roasting

Baking

Grilling

Shallow Frying

Deep Frying

Stir-frying

Microwave Cooking

 

Guide To Modern Cookery (G.A. Escoffier) states:

Except for the roasts, grills, and fryings, which will be discussed later, all culinary operations dealing with meat are related to one of the four following methods: Braising, Poeling, Poaching, and Sautes.

These four methods of cooking belong, however, to the sauces, and this explains how it is that the latter holds such a pre-eminent position in French Cookery.

 

Chinese Cooking (Morning Glory Publishers, Beijing, no writer given) lists as follows:

Quick Boiling (Cuan)

Instant Boiling (Shuan)

Stewing (Ao)

Braisng (Hui)

"Jian" Frying

"Ta" Frying

"Tie" Frying

"Zha" Deep Frying

"Liu" Frying

several methods of saute

"Chao" Stir-frying

Pure Stir-frying

"Twice Cooked" Stir-frying

"Boa" Quick-frying

"Peng" frying

"Dun" Stewing"

"Men" braising

"Lu" stewing in gravy

"Jiang" stewing

"Shao" stewing

"Pa" stewing

Boiling

Steaming

Roasting

Smoking

Mud baking

"Wei" slow cooking

 

 

why all this info?

well, it could be argued that in the Chinese listing that all the stewing is the same core foundation technique, while in french cookery the peculiarities of a certain dish would suggest that particular terms don't fit appropriately, hence the debate of what constitutes a foundation cooking technique. I think what matters most is understanding a foundation that covers the repertoire within the range of the cuisine being considered.

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