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suckling pig

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
How many Chefs do you think would cook suckling pig if they could find them? What types of restaurants would serve them?
post #2 of 7
Thread Starter 
That's interesting. I am in Oregon, and I heard that suckling pig was popular in California Restaurants. Also, Chinese restaruants, here, are looking for suckling pigs for Banquets and Weddings and such. They can't find them USDA inspected. I think I could build a business on growing them.
post #3 of 7
I used to work at Les Nomades in Chicago and one of their signature dishes was roast suckling pig with dijon mustard. It was very tender, very tasty, and very popular. I am suprised more restaurants don't offer it.
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
In your opinion, how large can they be? Length and weight. What does the perfect suckling pig look like before/after it is roasted? How many ways can it be prepared? How many will it feed? What is the cost? Inquiring minds want to know.
post #5 of 7
I know that Watusi (Chicago) serves it, and generally they're out of it fairly early in the evening.
post #6 of 7
At the hotel where I work in NY, we have suckling pig on the menu every day. It's boned out and stuffed with a farce and then baked. I feel bad because they are so small. It's almost like it never even saw daylight.
post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
How many of them would any of you use in a month if they were easy access(frozen) 15 to 25 lbs. at $4.00lb.
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